Arithmetic representation of symbols according to certain rules

In summary, the conversation discusses a sequence of symbols and the rules for transforming one symbol into one or more symbols. The order and cycles in the rules do not matter as they are only applied once in transforming a sentence. The discussion also mentions the potential use of this context-free language in cryptography and the difficulty of studying the statistical structure of the sequences with a limited number of symbols.
  • #36
Adel Makram said:
Is it possible to run your program to find the minimum length of symbols in the same generation that repeats itself?
I think if you are going to make any progress in this subject you should learn to do these things for yourself. If you don't like the look of @jbriggs444's Perl code, try it in Python: you can run it for yourself without installing anything at https://replit.com/@pbuk/StingyInfiniteNlp#main.py, and if you sign up for a repl.it account you can even try some edits.
Python:
# See https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/arithmetic-representation-of-symbols-according-to-certain-rules.1016467/

replacements = {
    'A': 'B',
    'B': 'C',
    'C': 'DE',
    'D': 'FC',
    'F': 'GA',
    'G': 'C',
    'E': 'HI',
    'H': 'J',
    'I': 'D',
    'J': 'D',
}

def transform(input):
    ''' Transform the input according to the rules '''
    output = ''
    for char in input:
        output += replacements[char]
    return output

truncateAt = 10

# Set the initial conditions.
current = 'A'
history = []

# This concise loop does all the work!
while not current in reversed(history):
    history.append(current)
    current = transform(current)[:truncateAt]

# Report the results.
cycle = len(history) - history.index(current)
count = len(history)
history.append(current)
print('Cycle length', cycle, 'after', count, 'iterations')

if truncateAt <= 100:
    for index, item in enumerate(history):
        if index == count - cycle or index == count:
            print(index, item, '<<<')
        else:
            print(index, item)
 
  • Like
Likes jbriggs444
<h2>1. What is arithmetic representation of symbols according to certain rules?</h2><p>Arithmetic representation of symbols according to certain rules is a method of using mathematical symbols and operations to represent and solve problems in a structured and consistent manner. It follows specific rules and conventions to ensure accurate and logical calculations.</p><h2>2. Why is arithmetic representation of symbols important?</h2><p>Arithmetic representation of symbols is important because it allows us to communicate and solve mathematical problems in a concise and standardized way. It also promotes a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts and helps us to identify and correct errors in our calculations.</p><h2>3. What are some common arithmetic symbols and their meanings?</h2><p>Some common arithmetic symbols include addition (+), subtraction (-), multiplication (x or *), division (/), and equals (=). Addition is used to combine quantities, subtraction is used to find the difference between quantities, multiplication is used to find the product of quantities, division is used to find the quotient of quantities, and equals is used to indicate that two quantities are equal.</p><h2>4. How do we follow the order of operations in arithmetic representation of symbols?</h2><p>In arithmetic representation of symbols, the order of operations is a set of rules that dictate which operations should be performed first in a mathematical expression. The acronym PEMDAS is commonly used to remember the order of operations: Parentheses, Exponents, Multiplication and Division (from left to right), Addition and Subtraction (from left to right).</p><h2>5. Can arithmetic representation of symbols be used in real-life situations?</h2><p>Yes, arithmetic representation of symbols can be used in real-life situations such as calculating prices and discounts while shopping, determining the amount of ingredients needed for a recipe, or calculating the distance and time for a trip. It is a valuable tool for solving everyday problems that involve numbers and quantities.</p>

Related to Arithmetic representation of symbols according to certain rules

1. What is arithmetic representation of symbols according to certain rules?

Arithmetic representation of symbols according to certain rules is a method of using mathematical symbols and operations to represent and solve problems in a structured and consistent manner. It follows specific rules and conventions to ensure accurate and logical calculations.

2. Why is arithmetic representation of symbols important?

Arithmetic representation of symbols is important because it allows us to communicate and solve mathematical problems in a concise and standardized way. It also promotes a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts and helps us to identify and correct errors in our calculations.

3. What are some common arithmetic symbols and their meanings?

Some common arithmetic symbols include addition (+), subtraction (-), multiplication (x or *), division (/), and equals (=). Addition is used to combine quantities, subtraction is used to find the difference between quantities, multiplication is used to find the product of quantities, division is used to find the quotient of quantities, and equals is used to indicate that two quantities are equal.

4. How do we follow the order of operations in arithmetic representation of symbols?

In arithmetic representation of symbols, the order of operations is a set of rules that dictate which operations should be performed first in a mathematical expression. The acronym PEMDAS is commonly used to remember the order of operations: Parentheses, Exponents, Multiplication and Division (from left to right), Addition and Subtraction (from left to right).

5. Can arithmetic representation of symbols be used in real-life situations?

Yes, arithmetic representation of symbols can be used in real-life situations such as calculating prices and discounts while shopping, determining the amount of ingredients needed for a recipe, or calculating the distance and time for a trip. It is a valuable tool for solving everyday problems that involve numbers and quantities.

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