Asked to Verify email when Unsubscribing from unsolicited e-mails

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In summary, some spammers are trying to collect your email address by asking you to unsubscribe. If you don't want your address shared, the best thing to do is to unsubscribe and mark the email as spam.
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WWGD

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I'm offered the option to unsubscribe. When I accept it, I'm asked to provide my email. Is this standard/legit?
Ok, so, I guess like just everyone else, I receive a(n) (over)load of spam in my Yahoo/Gmail accounts. Some of the emails offer the option to unsubscribe.Yet when I accept it, I'm asked to provide my email. Is this standard/legit? I suspect these sites use a spambot and generates random addresses and they have no way of telling is these are legit. If I do send it to them, they know it's legit. I haven't been able to block the address. Ay ideas for unsubscribing or blocking, etc?
 
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  • #2
WWGD said:
Some of the emails offer the option to unsubscribe.Yet when I accept it, I'm asked to provide my email. Is this standard/legit?
The ones I have clicked on automatically have the email address. They often (optionally) ask the reason for unsubscribing, and that's it.
 
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  • #3
Sounds suspicious. I would just go back and report the sender as spam and delete/block it. If it already has your e-mail address as @Wrichik Basu says, then it's probably safe to Unsubscribe.
 
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  • #4
They want to know which emails are live accounts, so the live ones can be used for more spam.
Why send 10,000,000 emails when 9,500,000 are dead or no longer used? Your response simply says use this live email in the next mass emailing, and with the smaller number being sent out, their costs are reduced.

The correct thing to do is NOT confirm you wish to unsubscribe your live email address from a list you didn't actually join. That action simply adds you to their live list.

And mark as spam, so any further emails go to the spam folder, and get recognised by the big email clients as ones to be dumped based on the souce they came from.
 
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  • #5
It might be necessary to remove the right address.
It might be an attempt to verify that "we have a live one".

How can you tell? Usually you can't
 
  • #6
I like @DrJohn 's advice. Marking it as spam rather than unsubscribing is safer and achieves the same goal. Of course, that assumes that your email provider manages the spam for you.
 
  • #7
I'm thinking of returning them the email of other spammers, to get them on the mailing lists.
 
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  • #8
Vanadium 50 said:
It might be necessary to remove the right address.
It might be an attempt to verify that "we have a live one".

How can you tell? Usually you can't
If you didn't subscribe to the list, haven't ever dealt with the company and especially if you don't recognise the company name, you get a very strong hint that they are collecting live addresses for future use. Or to sell on as verified to be live emails. Playing around on the internet I once came across someone selling sets of verified live email address - 10,000, 50,000, 250,000 of them at about one cent per 10 in the pack. I've seen a few screenshots in news articles about the dark web showing similar sets of email addresses for sale.

Yes, it might be a legitimate company that shares your details with a sister company and said so when you first subscribed. This usually results in regular emails from a known company and are more likely to honour your unsubscribe. But they usually code your email into the unsubscribe button, and it gets passed to their list as unsubscribe. So asking you to enter the email address is often the sign that it is collecting data.

One thing I also do is view ALL emails with images switched off, to avoid displaying the one pixel square tracking image that is coded to include the email address or activate a cookie. I only open images if I trust the sender or think I need to see what the image is. The tracking image does confirm the email address is live.

Even totally honest newsletters use a tracking image. I used to run a newsletter for a club, and at one committee meeting a committee member said he hadn't recieved an important email that required something to be checked before the meeting. I opened the newsletter admin section, and told him what day and time he opened it, and that he then opened it the following evening twice more to check something. Then he looked very embarassed at his feeble excuse for not doing some important work before the meeting. The one pixel image in the newsletter triggered the "email opened" feedback.

We were not spying on him, I used the tracking to work out who was no longer interested in receiving the weekly newsletter - we had a lot of Uni students in the club, and it helped me remove those who had left the uni, changed their email address (I'd check with the office if they were still a member) or were no longer interested in the club, while many others who had left the club still read the newsletter regularly several years after leaving. Clicking the unsubscribe in our case updated your database entry automatically. You didn't enter the email address.
 
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  • #9
I actually run my own mail server, and for a good while I was using unique addresses for everything. It was remarkable what would happen with a one-time address from a one-time purchase. Warranty registrations spread shockingly far.

But I agree with you - there certainly are clues as to the intentions of the unsubscribe page. Sometimes the clues give you a pretty good guess. Sometimes not so much.
 
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  • #10
Just read about code called tracking urls. Will look into it , maybe I can find out where the emails are coming from.
Edit: Would be great if there was something similar for texting , where you can tell where a text originated.
 
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  • #11
Yahoo Mail often sent me spam/phishings with invalid/missing e-mail addresses because its algorithm thought my addy was similar enough (though it usually wasn't) that it might be for me.

So, maybe check the To: (or CC: or BCC: or whatever other) fields to see if you're the actual intended recipient.
 
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  • #12
WWGD said:
I receive a(n) (over)load of spam in my Yahoo/Gmail accounts. Some of the emails offer the option to unsubscribe.Yet when I accept it, I'm asked to provide my email.
Instead of yours, provide the address of some support or feedback address related to the account.
Once upon a time it was our favourite practice to sign up for spam sources with the address of the IT support.
That was the fastest and most reliable way to get them filtered.
We have never dared to tell it to the support guys, though... :nb) o0)
 
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  • #13
In my experience, Gmail is extremely good at handling spam. Just mark it as Spam and let Google do whatever it does, and it won't bother you again.
 
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1. Why am I being asked to verify my email when unsubscribing from unsolicited emails?

When you unsubscribe from unsolicited emails, the sender is required by law to confirm that you are the owner of the email address and have given consent to unsubscribe. This verification process helps prevent others from unsubscribing on your behalf and ensures that you are only unsubscribing from emails that you no longer wish to receive.

2. Is it safe to verify my email when unsubscribing from unsolicited emails?

Yes, it is safe to verify your email when unsubscribing from unsolicited emails. The verification process is usually done through a secure link or a code sent to your email, and it only confirms that you are the owner of the email address and have requested to unsubscribe. It does not collect any personal information or give access to your email account.

3. Can I just ignore the email verification when unsubscribing from unsolicited emails?

No, it is not recommended to ignore the email verification when unsubscribing from unsolicited emails. If you do not verify your email, your request to unsubscribe may not be processed, and you may continue to receive unwanted emails from the sender. It is essential to complete the verification process to ensure that your request to unsubscribe is successfully received and processed.

4. How long does the email verification process take when unsubscribing from unsolicited emails?

The email verification process when unsubscribing from unsolicited emails typically takes a few seconds to a few minutes, depending on the sender's system. Sometimes, it may take longer if there are technical issues or if the sender has a manual verification process in place. If you do not receive a verification email, you can try again or contact the sender for further assistance.

5. Will verifying my email when unsubscribing from unsolicited emails stop all unwanted emails?

Verifying your email when unsubscribing from unsolicited emails will only stop emails from that specific sender. If you are receiving unsolicited emails from multiple senders, you will need to unsubscribe and verify your email for each sender separately. Additionally, some senders may still send you emails even after you have unsubscribed and verified your email, so it is important to regularly check your email settings and mark any unwanted emails as spam.

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