Aspects of math that are often over-formulated on curriculum

  • Thread starter binbagsss
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In summary, It was discussed that sometimes curriculum can include too many formulas, such as the quotient rule and the product rule in calculus. It was agreed that the quotient rule is a very useful formula to know, as it is easier to use than deriving it from scratch. Some examples for undergrad were also mentioned, and it was noted that while the quotient rule can be represented as to the power of -1, it is still useful to have it as a separate formula.
  • #1
binbagsss
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Hi,

I think sometimes curriculum contains to many formulae.
E.g in calculus why is there a need for the quotient rule when there is the product rule

Does anyone agree?
Any examples for undergrad too anyone can think of?
 
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  • #2
The quotient rule is a very useful one. I still use it a lot. It's much easier than to derive it from the product rule from scratch. So it's a useful formula to know.
 
  • #3
micromass said:
The quotient rule is a very useful one. I still use it a lot. It's much easier than to derive it from the product rule from scratch. So it's a useful formula to know.

but you can just put it as to the power of -1?
 
  • #4
binbagsss said:
but you can just put it as to the power of -1?

Yeah sure, I know you can. I still find it useful as a separate formula so I don't have to do that all the time.
 

Related to Aspects of math that are often over-formulated on curriculum

What are the most common aspects of math that are over-formulated on curriculum?

The most frequently over-formulated aspects of math on curriculum include algebraic equations, geometry proofs, fractions and decimals, graphing, and word problems.

Why are these aspects of math often over-formulated on curriculum?

These aspects are often over-formulated because they are foundational skills that are necessary for more advanced math concepts. Teachers and curriculum developers want to ensure that students have a strong understanding of these concepts before moving on to more complex topics.

How can over-formulation of math concepts affect students?

Over-formulation can cause students to become disengaged and frustrated with math. It can also lead to a lack of conceptual understanding, as students may focus on rote memorization rather than truly understanding the concepts.

What can teachers do to prevent over-formulation of math concepts?

Teachers can incorporate real-world applications and problem-solving activities into their lessons to make math more engaging and meaningful for students. They can also use a variety of teaching methods and resources to help students grasp the concepts in different ways.

How can curriculum developers improve the balance of formulation in math curriculum?

Curriculum developers can work closely with teachers and educational researchers to ensure that the balance of formulation in math curriculum is appropriate. They can also regularly review and update the curriculum to incorporate new teaching methods and resources that can better engage students and promote conceptual understanding.

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