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Atomic Conservation in Ionized Hydrogen Gas

  1. Mar 18, 2016 #1
    Dear all,
    So I have a question concerning atomic conservation in an ionized hydrogen gas. So imagine we have ## H_2 ## initially. Later the gas is taken to an appreciable temperature such that at equilibrium the following species are present, ## e^-, \ H, \ H^+, \ H_2, \ H^-, \ \text{and} \ H_2^+##. In order to properly minimize the Gibbs free energy for such a system I need to appropriately apply atomic conservation in the form,
    ##b_k = \sum_{i = 1}^n a_{i,k} \ y_i ##
    where ## a_{i,k} ## is the number of atoms of component ## k ## in species ## i ##, ## b_k ## is the number moles of component ## k ## per mass of mixture, ## n ## is the total number of species, and ## y_i ## is the number of moles of species ## i ## per mass of the mixture. This is fairly simple when dealing with chemical systems that are not ionizing. However, I am confused about how to treat the atomic conservation in the case of ionized hydrogen. I am not entirely sure how to treat the electron and other ions, so that the conservation is consistent. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 21, 2016 #2

    DrClaude

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    In this case, I would take the "chemical species" to be protons and electrons, and write the conservation equations for p and e.
     
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