Atomic Physics - Xrays and energy

In summary, the energy levels of a molybdenum atom are approximately: K shell .............................................. – 20.00 KeVL shell .............................................. – 2.52 KeVM shell .............................................. – 0.23 KeV
  • #1
pat666
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Homework Statement


5 The energy levels of a molybdenum atom are approximately:
K shell ….. – 20.00 KeV
L shell …... – 2.52 KeV
M shell …... – 0.23 KeV

i) Estimate the energy of the Kα, K[tex]\beta[/tex] and Lα x-ray emissions.
ii) What are the wavelengths of these emissions?

Homework Equations


The Attempt at a Solution



I think K[tex]\alpha[/tex] is from L shell to k shell??
so EK[tex]\alpha[/tex]=-2.52KeV--20KeV
E=17.48KeV

and the K[tex]\beta[/tex] is from M shell to K shell?
then find the difference again for the energy

I don't know what the L[tex]\alpha[/tex] is but possibly L shell to ground state or M shell to L shell??

not sure if anything I am doing there is right?

ii)
shouldn't be hard once I have energy's
E=hf so E=hc/[tex]\lambda[/tex]

not sure if anything I am doing here is right?

Thanks for any help!
 
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  • #3
Thanks ehild and wiki,
so the Lα transition is from M to L.
I'm a bit confused as to whether or not the element is relevant to any of the calculations, from what I read on wiki it seems related by the amount of energy gained form each transition but since I have those values I shouldn't even need to know that the element is molybdendum?
also I did the wave length calculation for the first transition and it came out to 1.24*10^-9m, this seems about right for an xray? (changed energy from KeV to J)

Thanks
 
  • #4
The x-ray lines are named by the letter of the final state. The element is not relevant as you were given the level energies. Check the magnitude of the wavelength, I got a different result.

ehild
 
  • #5
Yeah, I converted 17.48eV instead of 17.48KeV
now I get 7.1*10^-11 m?
seems like a tiny wavelength.
thanks.
 
  • #6
X rays are of very short wavelength. Read the first sentences of the article. ehild
 
  • #7
Thanks for helping ehild!
 

Related to Atomic Physics - Xrays and energy

1. What is atomic physics?

Atomic physics is a branch of physics that studies the properties and behaviors of atoms, the smallest units of matter that make up all substances. It deals with the structure, composition, and interactions of atoms, as well as the energy and forces involved in these interactions.

2. How do X-rays work?

X-rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation with higher energy and shorter wavelengths than visible light. They are produced when high-speed electrons collide with a metal target, causing the electrons to emit energy in the form of X-rays. These X-rays can penetrate through most materials and are used in medical imaging and other applications.

3. What is the relationship between energy and atomic physics?

Atomic physics is closely related to energy because the behavior of atoms is governed by the laws of quantum mechanics, which describe the behavior of particles at the atomic and subatomic level. This includes the energy levels and transitions that occur within atoms as well as the energy involved in interactions between atoms.

4. How are X-rays used in medicine?

X-rays are commonly used in medical imaging to produce images of bones and soft tissues inside the body. They are able to pass through the body and create an image on a film or digital detector, allowing doctors to diagnose and treat various conditions and injuries.

5. What are the potential dangers of X-rays?

While X-rays have many useful applications, they also have the potential to cause harm if not used properly. Exposure to high levels of X-rays can damage cells and DNA, leading to health problems such as cancer. This is why proper safety precautions, such as shielding and limiting exposure, are important when working with X-rays.

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