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Attention, Students ! Naps boost memory, but only if you dream

  1. Apr 23, 2010 #1

    rhody

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    By Denise Mann, Health.com
    April 22, 2010 12:56 p.m. EDT


    With finals coming up for many, I wish I was aware of this when in college.
    If you try it, and it really helps, (I don't know how you make yourself dream) please report back.
    Rhody...

    Edit:

    MATH_IS_HARD reported a similar effect a few years ago on PF: "[URL="https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=125203"[/URL]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2017
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  3. Apr 23, 2010 #2

    Dembadon

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    I'm not much of a napper. I have a hard time falling asleep when there are things I could be getting accomplished.

    On days when my schedule is light, I'll still avoid taking a nap even if I feel sleepy; whenever I nap, even if it's only for 30-60 minutes, I end up being wide awake until some ungodly hour in the evening/morning.
     
  4. Apr 23, 2010 #3
    That is bad for your memory, the amount of exercises or reading done is not what matters but how much of it you retain afterwards.
     
  5. Apr 23, 2010 #4

    Dembadon

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    Not everything on my "to-do" list requires memorization, nor are they always related to school.

    I'm talking about life in general. Napping when I could be cleaning our garage, working in the yard, keeping our cars in good running condition, etc. is difficult for me to do. I realize there are intellectual benefits, but it's the loss of time that makes it hard for me. Some have said that I'm oversubscribed/too ambitious with my time. Perhaps they're right; however, I've always seen it as an opportunity to improve my time management skills. :smile:
     
  6. Apr 23, 2010 #5
    Sometimes, napping can be a bad thing. Getting a nap may make it more difficult to fall asleep on time at night, preventing you from getting 8 hours straight at night. At least when I take a midday nap, I have trouble going to bed at night.

    A better solution which accomplishes the same thing is to study at night, but get to bed at a reasonable hour and sleep a full 8 hours.
     
  7. Jul 6, 2010 #6

    rhody

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    http://www.projo.com/education/content/SCHOOL_START_TIME_SLEEP_07-06-10_BTJ3V3C_v18.1687c8e.html"

    Interesting experiment:

    and
    and
    It seems that naps may work for college aged kids to some extent, but for elementary school kids the result of this experiment are striking to say the least, and from this study naps are to be short for younger kids, no mention of dreaming either.

    Rhody...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2017
  8. Jul 6, 2010 #7
    I don't see how this is surprising, when what little is understood about sleep and dreaming seems to point to it being critical in the organization of information for later retrieval. This Calvinist ethic of modern schools is baseless in its application, which is running counter to virtually all evidence to the benefits of proper sleep, and the dangers of NOT getting that sleep.
     
  9. Jul 6, 2010 #8

    rhody

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    I agree with you. To me, the funny part is that the educator's who control the what, when and content of class day/curriculum read the research that suggests changing class times and length can have desired effects on children's performance in the classroom, and, as an "experiment" implement it. Low and behold, the suggested benefits are there to be seen, recorded, measured and compared to performance under the old circumstances. The results speak for themselves.

    Rhody...
     
  10. Jul 6, 2010 #9
    Unfortunately the results compete with interests other than the health and education of our children. The welfare of children continues to be one of those terribly gray areas in my view, and that of adults not too far off. Consider the history of the "Go" and "No-Go" pills in the USAF, which has now evolved into Modafinil and beyond. Sleep is somewhat poorly understood, yet we have no qualms about tinkering with it in profound ways for dubious gains and "character building".
     
  11. Jul 6, 2010 #10
    It wasn't the half an hour later start that made it, it was the whole thing trying to convey the concept of sleep being important.
    Look at this:
    Basically, sleep time was increased by 45 minutes, 15 minutes more than the later start! As you can see just looking at the short term effects is worthless, you need to do a thorough study where you look at different schools different starting times and how it effects the kids sleeping schedules, this one doesn't really say much at all.
     
  12. Jul 7, 2010 #11
    I don't see how an extra 15 minutes obviates the results at all...
     
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