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Medical Autsim -many people does not care!

  1. Jun 29, 2006 #1
    Hey,

    I have read many articles regarding Autism but I think i have not grasp even its basics in an excellent way.

    I wonder: Does individuals with Autism really 'do not care' about others since they dont interact with other people as more than 'objects' or a bit more than objects. Some articles i read did claim this in a way or in another. However; I found in the new society there TONS of individuals who dont consider others, and commit crimes, wether it be in the battlefields or in the offices in politics or that fight with a younger boy after school.

    Thx in advance for help, truely appreciated :approve:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 1, 2006 #2

    Evo

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    I seriously doubt that someone holding political office or a soldier or a school yard bully would suffer from autism.

    I suggest you read this to understand better. http://www.nimh.nih.gov/publicat/autism.cfm
     
  4. Jul 17, 2006 #3
    I get really emotional attached to object alot it causes alot of stress sometimes when no one seems to understand people think im selfish sometimes, if somethings mine i want to keep it forever..guess im very sentimental, most objects have very deep meaning too me even the most randomest thing, an everyday object. i guess i can understand why autistic people may have unusual attachments to objects and as for not interacting with people possibly because theyre afraid of getting hurt? because they are in fact very emotional and care about people so feel vunrable and afraid, these are only my opinions.
    is autism genetic?
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2006
  5. Jul 17, 2006 #4

    Kurdt

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    People with autism are not afraid of getting hurt by interaction with others. They have problems understanding other people as they can't recognise subtelties of body language and in more severe cases have poor spoken and listening language skills. And in response to the OP, it is not that people with autism do not care they merely find it as difficult to express themselves effectively as they do in understanding.

    There is some evidence to suggest autism is genetic but I suggest you visit the link that Evo provided if you are curious.
     
  6. Jul 17, 2006 #5

    arildno

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    Since the theory of autism has been developed by non-autists, the subjective, experential aspects of being autistic is a mere conjecture from the side of non-autists.
    Thus, that part of the theory is of no scientific weight.

    Descriptions of how autists interacts with other, however, may be of great value.
     
  7. Jul 17, 2006 #6

    J77

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    There was a recent bbc story into how common the condition is: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/5174144.stm

    However, some trouble with making a condition common is that, for example, people who are slower to learn may get "put on the spectrum" when other diagnoses may apply.

    A bit like how all badly behaved kids these days must have ADHD.

    And back to the OP, I don't think it's quite as simple as "interacting with people as objects". Like you say, it's hard to grasp. Mainly because of the broad spectrum...

    But I still think that such a spectrum shouldn't grow to enable a diagnosis of shy, retiring people as autistic.
     
  8. Jul 17, 2006 #7
    My son is autistic. As indicated in the article linked to by Evo, we were aware of the problem almost from birth, but it was not diagnosed until he was nearly 3 years old. We were advised to look into the possibility as the result of bringing him for a hearing test. We went through various stages of denial until this past year with him at the age of 12.

    It is rather difficult to describe exactly what is different about my son. He is personable, makes eye contact, is intelligent (though not a savant like Rainman), is aware of everything that goes on around him, cares intensely about his family and about what others think of him. These traits are what got in the way of our accepting the diagnosis. And yet we have always known that there is something about him that is going to be one of the central issues of his life forever. It's not as easy to put your finger on it as you may have been lead to believe.

    Through my son, I have met many other autistic children. They run a wide spectrum of behaviors and problems. Contrary to the image of a flat personality, I find these children to exhibit as wide a range as any group that size.
     
  9. Jul 17, 2006 #8
    I see no reason why not. I know of one young man who while not a bully is certainly bossy and overbearing.

    Edit: Removed comments concerning Bill Gates. I doubt that he actually suffers from Asperger's.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2006
  10. Jul 17, 2006 #9

    Kurdt

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    There are many people in positions of authority that have been described as exhibiting symptoms of aspergers which is a relatively mild version of autism (at the bottom of the spectrum if you will). Certainly many who tend to exhibit what would be termed as eccentric behaviour get chalked up as having aspergers. How many of them actually do is not known to me and I'm not sure if there is an 'official' list of these people.

    Anyway the point being its all about perceptions and when many people think of autism they think of the rainman film or more recently A Beautiful Mind.
     
  11. Jul 19, 2006 #10
  12. Jul 19, 2006 #11

    GCT

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    There is one aspect that distinctively separates autistic children from all others...they lack a component of awareness; and it isn't too excessive to say that they have been deprived of consciousness, but perhaps not core consciousness.

    There isn't too much of a problem with recognition, some have normal and even superior IQs, however it's almost as if they have much briefer periods of consciousness, or it's somehow relatively more intermitten. Extended consciousness is the main problem, it's a problem with integration of information for longer periods of time such as to suffice the world to become "real."

    I've recently read upon some interesting research conducted by Dr. Geier, who is a respected scientist (MD) in his field, that is until recently when he started administering Lupron to Autistic children with the belief that it is testosterone which exacerbates the effects of mercury, which in some cases is believed to be the main etiological factor for autistic symptoms. I've talked with him briefly over email and it seems from some of the information he had sent me, and I haven't been able to understand whether he believes in any of the direct effects of testosterone on the brain, such as those that relate to the recent male brain hypothesis. I can somewhat see how the latter premise can directly contribute to autistic symptoms.

    Imagine if you had the same hormonal influences at the age of 7 as when most of you probably went through such maturation during the normal age span....12-teens. Although Lupron is adminstered to castrate offenders it is also employed to treat precocious puberty. Not only are the physical changes brought on early, the mental effects are also onset, the testosterone levels are way higher then what is normal for these children's age (multiple times higher, I'm not quite sure if I can quote the source at this time, since the article copy he had given me ask that I not distribute it, so it seems that he has not published it fully at the moment). So a lot of these children spend most of their time masturbating (and after the eventual build up of irritation, proceed to endanger themselves in many ways, it's quite sad really) while they should be socializing and opening up to the world.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2006
  13. Jul 20, 2006 #12

    Kurdt

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    So basically this guy is saying the early release of testosterone has an effect on the brain of a child that causes the child to display autistic symptoms as the brain was not correctly prepared for the 'chemical assault' of testosterone at that age? Does he also say that the degree of autism depends on how much exposure the brain had? Hmm. I might be open to the testosterone theory but I'm not sure what masturbation has to do with it.

    Anyway it would also explain why boys tend to have more autistic traits than girls I suppose.
     
  14. Jul 20, 2006 #13

    arildno

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    It seems to me that these kids use masturbation as the most accessible form of self-healing (immediate tension-release).

    That this alienates further from the "real world" and hence a continual build-up of frustration that must be released again is really saddening.

    As I see it, what must be thought out and (taught them?) are other, more constructive and lasting forms of (self-)healing than masturbation.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2006
  15. Jul 20, 2006 #14

    Kurdt

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    Do not normal kids when they go through puberty masturbate? I don't get why it should be linked with autism or autistic traits (other than the fact that they have perhaps started puberty sooner).
     
  16. Jul 20, 2006 #15

    selfAdjoint

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    For boys the old rule was "9 out of 10 guys masturbate and the tenth guy is a liar." Exceptions might be very unsocialized guys who just never realized - and never had any opportunity to learn - that it could be done. That would delay onset of masturbation a year or two.
     
  17. Jul 20, 2006 #16

    Kurdt

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    Well that proves my point that most do it anyway but what I was trying to say is that it was implied that only people that have autism display this behaviour. Or at least that was the implication to me.
     
  18. Jul 20, 2006 #17

    GCT

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    The mentioning of the masturbation was only in accordance with the topic of precocious puberty, it isn't intricately tied to autism directly. The testosterone levels were quite monstrous for the sample in the pertinent article. And they all display an interest in the female body...at the early age of 7, while most other children are concerned about contracting "cuties" (spelling?) from females and keeping them out of their treehouses. The thing about testosterone is that it takes the predominant role in onsetting some rapid changes as puberty starts, all teenagers deal with this period where physical changes and emotional desires are seemingly
    of great importance.

    By the way, selfadjoint, the rate is much lower then the statistic you've mentioned as it has been discovered more recently, it's closer to 50%, I'll quote the source later on today as I should really be getting to my research.
     
  19. Jul 20, 2006 #18

    Kurdt

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    Ah ok seems I misunderstood you.
     
  20. Jul 20, 2006 #19

    arildno

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    Oh, I always thought the tenth did it more than he ought to. Hence his denial of the whole thing.
     
  21. Jul 20, 2006 #20

    selfAdjoint

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    It was spelled Cooties where I grew up.
     
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