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Black Holes and Quantum Field Theory

  1. Jun 1, 2012 #1
    Now, I must preface this by saying that my understanding of QFT is limited, and my understanding of GR is even more so. Nevertheless, I was reading about the No Hair Theorem, and it seemed to me to be suggestive of the indiscernibility of Quantum Particles. Obviously, for a macroscopic black hole, this is merely analogy, but for a microscopic black hole, this isn't necessarily true. If a black hole can be quantized solely by M, Q, and L, then, on the microscopic level, it would make sense to have Q at the very least quantized. It also wouldn't be entirely out of the question to associate L with spin, since they are both intrinsic angular momenta. This would lead one to conclude that black holes must be bosonic since they can have 0 angular momenta (Schwarzchild BH). If it were some how possible to attribute a bosonic field to a black hole, it would make sense to describe it by the two coupling constants Q and M, and have a spin L. Is this logical, or is it too speculative.
     
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  3. Jun 1, 2012 #2

    mfb

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    The Schwarzschild solution is a solution for GR, it does not imply that it is a quantum-mechanical solution.

    Spin quantisation of black holes... I am sure there are publications about it, but I don't know any.
    This is about charge
     
  4. Jun 1, 2012 #3
    Thanks. I wasn't saying that the Schwarzchild solution was also a QM solution, merely that it shows a black hole can have 0 angular momentum.
     
  5. Jun 1, 2012 #4

    mfb

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    It shows that there is a spacetime geometry with 0 angular momentum. But that is just a mathematical thing. We don't know if this solution (in GR) can exist in the universe.

    I wouldn't expect BH to be fermions, but maybe they are? Or even something completely different, as the classification gets more complicated once we leave the classical 3 dimensions.
     
  6. Jun 1, 2012 #5
    True. I guess a more pressing issue is whether the metric even applies at quantum scales. Still, it seems that the No Hair theorem is suggestive of a link between QM and GR.
     
  7. Jun 2, 2012 #6

    Bill_K

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    In real life, black holes form from collapsing objects, and the odds of producing a hole with zero angular momentum is just that, essentially zero. In fact every black hole will have at least some angular momentum and therefore be Kerr rather than Schwarschild.

    And as far as a black hole being bosonic or fermionic, all you have to do is drop one additional electron into the hole to make it the other one.
     
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