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Blood Transfusions make me more than me?

  1. Dec 25, 2014 #1

    DaveC426913

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    So, I just had 4 units of whole blood tranfused into me. (I am O+)

    Someone pointed out that I am also the likely recipient of some antibodies my donors might have.


    Does this mean that, if one of those donors had, like, a cold in their past, that I now have antibodies protecting me from that cold virus? What about other antibodies?

    Conceptually, am I metabolically "distinct" from who I was last week? Does that kind of thing show up in tests, at least theoretically? i.e. can a future test indicate that I might have had a transfusion in my history?
     
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  3. Dec 25, 2014 #2

    Evo

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    Good grief, what happened?
     
  4. Dec 25, 2014 #3

    DaveC426913

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    The doctor felt he should replace the 2 units I left in the bathroom sink and the 2 units I left on the bedroom floor next to my bed.

    And while doing so, he edumacated me on what a Dieulafoy's[/PLAIN] [Broken] Lesion is.

    Very dumb story. Managed to convince myself I was looking at a couple of glasses of undigested fortified port wine. Protip: real blood - especially in large quantities - sometimes really does look as fake as it looks in a CSI episode...

    Long story short: a lookie-loo with a scope - a zap and a clip and I'm good as new. Home after three days.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  5. Dec 25, 2014 #4

    Doug Huffman

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    Yes, excess materials are transferred with transfusions. I was a high volume long time - ten years - platelet apheresis donor that specialized in immune compromised patients. I could sole source them for years at a time.

    I quit when ARC unilaterally prohibited my CCW. Now they are about to permit HIV+ donations.
     
  6. Dec 25, 2014 #5

    Evo

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    Geeze, I'm so glad that they acted quickly and you are better.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  7. Dec 25, 2014 #6
    Port wine - yeah my dad used to buy the stuff by the jug to last whole year.
    Now my brother is of the age that he has tad now and then.
     
  8. Dec 25, 2014 #7
    The antibodies would be short-lived , but it is possible for some white-cells to be transfused, and that could be permanent ...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microchimerism http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17198844
     
  9. Dec 26, 2014 #8

    berkeman

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    Holy crap Dave! Glad you made it!
     
  10. Jan 4, 2015 #9
    I assume you know the difference between fresh whole blood and packed red cells.

    Most blood transfusions for lost blood is by units of packed red cells, these can be thought of as collected blood that's then had all the plasma, white cells and platelets removed so you are left with a bag mainly containing only the red cells concentrated up.

    I assume they had time to fully cross match blood to your type.

    In an emergency when you don't have time to do a 30min cross match and antibody screen you can use Oneg blood.

    If you did receive only red cells then they will only hang around for 2-3 months then are removed while your body makes its own red cells.

    Packed red cells do contain a very small amount of whites cells and antibodies and special filters can be added to remove white cells in haematology patients but not usually used in ordinary red cell transfusions.
     
  11. Jan 4, 2015 #10
    Yes it's a possibility although to be "metabolically distinct" you have to have repeated blood transfusions for a long period of time. The phenomenon is passive transfer of antibody from the donor. Sometimes, this can create problems. For example, there can be passive IgE transfer from the donor. On subsequent introduction of allergen into the recipients blood, allergic reaction may take place.

    source: http://www.transfusionmedicine.ca/articles/iga-deficiency

    In a retrospective study of chronic hemodialysis patients it was seen that they had acquired hepatitis antibody due to numerous blood transfusion. This was in 1982. This kind of scenario is highly uncommon now because if you have the risk of developing post transfusion allergic reaction then saline washed RBC or frozen/deglycerolized RBC is used. Saline removes 99% of non cellular elements.

    Source: http://nybloodcenter.org/products-services/blood-products/red-blood-cells/
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6918195

    There are chances of transfer of antigens to your body too.
     
  12. Jan 6, 2015 #11

    DaveC426913

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    Well, that's been no fun. Rebleed on 28th sent me back in. Been in ICU ever since. Just got discharged to ward today.

    I now have 13 units (4L) of strangers' blood in me.

    As an aside, I've picked up a new interest in skeeball, seem to be acquiring a Korean accent - and I'd like to be called Sarah from now on.
     
  13. Jan 6, 2015 #12

    berkeman

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    Ouch. Glad you're out of ICU and on the mend, Dave. :-)
     
  14. Jan 7, 2015 #13
    .

    Apparently you can get away with keeping your beard ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conchita_Wurst
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  15. Jan 7, 2015 #14

    DaveC426913

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    Turns out packed red cells are indeed what I've been getting.
     
  16. Jan 8, 2015 #15
    "Packed red cells" have probably undergone leukoreduction , but are not free of "all" of white cells ...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Packed_red_blood_cells#Collection.2C_processing.2C_and_use

    Microchimerism probably didn't occur , even if it did, probably would not cause problems,
    ( and had the large-volume transfusion not been applied the result probably would have been a pine-overcoat).

    But the question was can you be permanently different as a result of blood-transfusion , in a way that is measurable ,
    and the correct answer is yes : e.g. via microchimerism.

    It is possible to lay-down a few bottles of ones own-brand for ones own future use , to avoid the possibility of blood-borne infection or microchimerism ... http://www.surgeryencyclopedia.com/A-Ce/Autologous-Blood-Donation.html
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2015
  17. Jan 8, 2015 #16
    Yes, but assuming you have received compatible blood ( and you still seem to be alive) these are generally clinically insignificant and will disappear.
    No
    Future tests can show that you have previously been transfused. The tests rely on the detection of antibodies you have produced following your immune response to foreign antigens present in the donor blood.
     
  18. Jan 10, 2015 #17

    DaveC426913

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    Sigh Still here. 22 days since this began - 17 of them in the hospital, 12 of those in Emerg/ICU. 15 units-o-blood now.

    But they've done "the procedure" - injected me with glue - that should stop this problem for sure.
     
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