Books for the theoretical minimum video courses

In summary, Kleppner & Kolenkow is a classic book on mechanics, Griffith's book on electrodynamics is good, and Susskind has written 2 books in the theoretical-minimum series (mechanics and quantum mechanics).
  • #1
nicklas_m123
7
0
Hi, everyone.

I'm currently taking a gap year, and my plan is to study physics, probably for the rest of my life (With that I mean, reading and learning physics for the rest of my life ;-) )

But I thought why not start now? I kind of have fallen in love with the lectures held by Leonard Susskind, that you can find on the theoretical minimum (http://theoreticalminimum.com/courses).
But the problem is, that I don't know what books I should read that relates to the courses.

Since the lectures are from Stanford University, I thought it might be possible to find the study plans the students followed when the lectures were filmed.
Or maybe you could recommend some books that match each course?
It's just that, it would be nice with a book that is using some of the same examples like in the lectures.

BTW, the book should be a book, you would read when taking a degree in physics at college. Or else I could just have read the book "The theoretical minimum".
 
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  • #2
What's your background in mathematics?
Kleppner & Kolenkow is a classic book on mechanics. I've heard that Griffith's book on electrodynamics is very good, also. But book of them require you to have a solid understanding of calculus.
 
  • #4
vanhees71 said:
Susskind has written 2 books in the theoretical-minimum series (mechanics and quantum mechanics), and I think they are great as a starting point.

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_...m&sprefix=susskind+,aps,214&tag=pfamazon01-20
Yeah, I know. But i really want to immerse myself into physics. And i don't think that two books with a total number of around 800 pages, covering so many different courses, can be that detailed. But yeah, I'm considering to read both of them, as a starting point.
 
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  • #5
ramzerimar said:
What's your background in mathematics?
Kleppner & Kolenkow is a classic book on mechanics. I've heard that Griffith's book on electrodynamics is very good, also. But book of them require you to have a solid understanding of calculus.

Well, i have just finished high school with A level math, so i don't have the solid understanding yet. But off course it is my intention to take a course in calculus.
But thanks for the recommendations.
 
  • #6
Does anyone know where I can download the theoretical minimum quantum mechanics videos? I was able to download the classical mechanics video from Itune U.
 
  • #7
 

Related to Books for the theoretical minimum video courses

1. What is the purpose of the "Books for the Theoretical Minimum Video Courses"?

The purpose of these books is to provide a comprehensive and rigorous introduction to the fundamental concepts of physics and mathematics that are essential for understanding modern science.

2. Who are the target audience for these books?

The books are primarily aimed at students and self-learners who want to gain a deeper understanding of physics and mathematics, as well as anyone interested in the theoretical foundations of science.

3. What topics are covered in the books?

The books cover a wide range of topics including classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics. They also include topics from mathematics such as calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations.

4. Do I need to have any prior knowledge or background in physics and mathematics to understand these books?

While some familiarity with basic math and physics concepts may be helpful, the books are designed to be accessible to beginners with no prior knowledge in these subjects. The author, Leonard Susskind, does an excellent job of breaking down complex concepts and explaining them in a clear and concise way.

5. Are these books meant to replace traditional textbooks?

No, these books are not meant to replace traditional textbooks. They are intended to supplement and enhance the learning experience for those interested in delving deeper into the theoretical foundations of physics and mathematics. However, they can also serve as a great resource for review and reference for students already studying these subjects.

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