Building a bridge from Alaska and Russia?

  • #26
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KM - I was encouraging you explain your reasoning in engineering terms. Faster, cleaner, safer than what? All three at once? Clearly the train is not faster than air travel. Regarding building in the near term: the OP allowed for a tunnel. I am unaware of any technical reason the Strait could not be crossed with a tunnel using today's technology, given it amounts to only two English Channel tunnels.

Actually, I was referring to faster than air travel. There have been some references (going back many years) to travel through evacuated tubes at speeds of over 1000 mph (1600 kph), and with continued advances in maglev technology, etc., this should become feasible. I was careful to point out that it is not an economically logical concept today, but in the future (twenty second century maybe) there is no reason to assume that it won't be.

KM
 
  • #27
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Actually, I was thinking of a connection something like http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/extreme-engineering-season-1-shorts-transatlantic-comm.html" [Broken], but I just feel that a concentration of tunnels in the Bearing Straits vicinity would be preferable in connecting the Americas to Eurasia, Africa and Australia. Also, the tubes would run along the continents in different directions, fanning out at various points. Again, think of centuries to build, not overnight. It probably wouldn't start in the near future.

http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2004-04/trans-atlantic-maglev" [Broken] are a couple of other references.

KM
 
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  • #28
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Due to seismic activity in the Bering Strait, the tunnel doesn't sound like such a great idea. Plus, once you get traffic out of the tunnel at either end it would have to be routed over some of the most desolate terrain imaginable.

I mentioned in my first insertion that this project would be along the 'Ring Of Fire', so there would be an obvious engineering challenge. It would not be an insurmountable hurdle, even today, so in the future it should be even easier to handle. Also, there is no reason to assume that these areas of Russia, Alaska, etc., will be so desolate in the future, if our development trends don't suddenly stop - - and assuming that our civilization doesn't suddenly cease.

KM
 
  • #29
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And http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/mega-engineering-building-a-transcontinental-tunnel.html" [Broken] are some more bits of information.

KM
 
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  • #31
mheslep
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Due to seismic activity in the Bering Strait, the tunnel doesn't sound like such a great idea. ...

I mentioned in my first insertion that this project would be along the 'Ring Of Fire', so there would be an obvious engineering challenge.
I'm not so sure. The Strait is well North of the Pacific Ring of Fire, i.e North of the Pacific plate. Both sides of the Strait are on the North American Tectonic Plate
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Plates_tect2_en.svg
 
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  • #34
turbo
Gold Member
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Interesting, I'd never heard of independent seismic 'blocks' before.
Yep, and apparently, they not only lift, subduct, and slide, but they can rotate with respect to the the surrounding continental plate(s). Not a good situation for the longevity of the Bering Tunnel.
 
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