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Calculating average forces on an Object

  1. Oct 30, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A 0.140kg baseball traveling 35.0 m/s strikes the catcher's mitt, which in bringing the ball to rest, recoils backward 11.0cm. What is the average force applied by the ball on the glove

    2. Relevant equations
    F=ma; FAB=-FBA

    3. The attempt at a solution
    Not sure where to start for this one

    Mod Edit: missing velocity value added to problem statement after it was supplied by the OP.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 30, 2016
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 30, 2016 #2

    gneill

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    Staff: Mentor

    For starters you need to supply the initial velocity. It looks like it got lost between your fingers and the keyboard.

    By the forum rules you need to make some attempt. What kinematic facts about the ball's motion can you derive from the given information?
     
  4. Oct 30, 2016 #3
    Oops. Yes the initial velocity is equal to 35.0m/s
    My frist attempt would have been a free body diagram depicting a ball traveling at the suggested speed coming in contact with the glove (or any object that acts against the ball's velocity. This in turn means there must be an opposing force (acceleration in the opposite direction of the ball's travel.) But since I don't know the acceleration, (or the time interval it took for the velocity to reach )m/s from 35m/s. how can I calculate that piece of information?
     
  5. Oct 30, 2016 #4

    gneill

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    Staff: Mentor

    Make a list of the SUVAT equations (look it up) and keep it handy. There is enough information given to find the acceleration if you choose the right equation from the list.
     
  6. Oct 30, 2016 #5
    Hey thanks for that I have never heard of the phrase SUVAT equations. This was greatly helpful!
     
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