Calculating current in parallel wire

In summary, the conversation discusses the calculation of the magnitude of current in a second parallel wire, given the distance between the wires, the current in the first wire, and the force per unit length exerted by the first wire. The equation used is F/\DeltaL=\mu0I1I2/2pi*r, and after correcting a mistake in the calculation, the magnitude of current in the second wire is found to be 2.7926e-11. The conversation also reminds the importance of checking one's own arithmetic before seeking help.
  • #1
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Homework Statement



A vertical straight wire carrying an upward 14.9A current exerts an attractive force per unit length of 8.50×10-4N/m on a second parallel wire 6.20cm away. What is the magnitude of the current that flows in the second wire?

Homework Equations



I2=2pir*F/I1*4pi e-7

The Attempt at a Solution



I2=2pi(.062)*8.5e-4/14.9*4pi e-7
I2=2.7926e-11

I keep getting ridiculous numbers and I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong...help?!
 
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  • #2
I think you got your equation slightly off.
Starting with F/[itex]\Delta[/itex]L=[itex]\mu[/itex]0I1I2/2pi*r, I ended up with
I2=(F/[itex]\Delta[/itex]L)(2pi*r/[itex]\mu[/itex]0I1).
 
  • #3
Check your own arithmetic. The exponents indicate you screwed up the division.

Do the basic checks before running for help.
 

1. How do you calculate the current in parallel wires?

To calculate the current in parallel wires, you will need to use Ohm's Law, which states that current (I) is equal to voltage (V) divided by resistance (R). This means that I = V/R. In parallel wires, the voltage is the same across each wire, so you can simply divide the total voltage by the total resistance to find the current.

2. What is the difference between series and parallel wires?

In series wires, the current flows through each wire in order, meaning that the resistance of each wire is added together to find the total resistance. In parallel wires, the current splits and flows through each wire separately, so the total resistance is less than the resistance of each individual wire.

3. Can the current in parallel wires be higher than the current in a single wire?

Yes, the current in parallel wires can be higher than the current in a single wire. This is because the total resistance of parallel wires is less than the resistance of a single wire, which allows more current to flow through.

4. How do you calculate the total resistance of parallel wires?

To calculate the total resistance of parallel wires, you will need to use the formula 1/Rt = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + 1/R3 + ... + 1/Rn, where Rt is the total resistance and R1, R2, R3, etc. are the resistances of each individual wire. Then, you can take the reciprocal of Rt to find the total resistance.

5. Can the current in parallel wires be different in each wire?

Yes, the current in parallel wires can be different in each wire. This is because the current splits and flows through each wire separately, so the resistance of each wire will affect the amount of current that flows through it.

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