1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Calculating the cut out section of a box

  1. Mar 10, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    a rectangular box with no top is formed by cutting out equal squares from the corners of a square sheet of metal, 10 cm by 10cm, and bending up the 4 sides. What size of square must be removed from each corner to generate a box with a volume of 50cm^3? (Note: there are 2 answers.)


    2. Relevant equations
    Tangent Line Approximation and Newton's Method



    3. The attempt at a solution
    This is a question where I do not know where to start. I know I am supposed to find the height of the box using the volume formula and am given the volume, but I don't know how to calculate the length. To me this seems to be a change in value question, where the volume is changing, but I don't think this is right :tongue:. Could anyone be of assistance here please to get me on the right track for this question? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 10, 2009 #2
    first of all, Tangent Line Approximation and Newton's Method will be of no help to you here.

    Code (Text):

    . . . . _______________ . . . .
    .      |               |      .
    .      | s           s |      .
    .______|               |______.
    |   s                     s   |
    |                             |
    |                             |
    |                             |
    |                             |
    |                             |
    |                             |
    |   s                     s   |
    |______                 ______|
    .      |               |      .
    .      | s           s |      .
    . . . .|_______________|. . . .

    |<---------- 10cm ----------->|
     
    As to solving the problem, try looking at my picture.

    EDIT: you shouldn't need any calculus to do this.
     
  4. Mar 11, 2009 #3
    Thanks foxjwill, I just put down both the tangent line approximation and Newton's Method because this is a question from those sections in my Calculus unit :tongue:. So from what I can see, 10-2s=L (or A=L^2-4s^2, V=L^2s) , where s is what I am looking for. I need to find L first then plug it into one of the formulas to find s. Would this be a case of substituting one equation into another, or would this be wrong?

    *L is the variable I assigned to the base sides, in case no one knew where that came from.
     
  5. Mar 11, 2009 #4
    Yup. it would be a case of substituting one equation into another.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook