1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Calculus Shoebox (help create a creative yet simple problem)

  1. Nov 5, 2008 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Make up a RELATED RATE word problem and illustrate it in a shoebox, using small toys, cutouts, pipe cleaner figures, play dough, etc. Don’t make your problem too hard, but it must involve calculus.

    1. Clearly written statement of the problem (separate from box as well as IN box).

    2.Answer key for problem; include labeled drawing, formulas, and complete solutionThis information should be inside the LID of the box and also on the back of theproblem statement.


    I can't think of an example to do that is creative enough. Like our teacher gave us these really creative ideas that past students have done, so I need to think of a CREATIVE yet simple problem for the shoebox!
    THANK YOU FOR ALL OF YOUR HELP!


    WELL, we were thinking of doing someone bungee jumping, but that complicated and trite.
    So, we need some ideas. Last year, one person did soccer and how when a goalie blocks the soccer ball kicked by another player and that forms a triangle so thats how they created a related rates problem with that.
    i don't want to copy that, so we need a totally different yet unique idea.
    any suggestions are appreciated!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 5, 2008 #2
    Can Someone Please HELP ME WITH THIS!! i will be eternally grateful!!
     
  4. Nov 6, 2008 #3
    The self unwrapping package. In the package is a daycounter; it can be set from 1 until 7. If the number of days passed is equal to the preset number some springs come loose and tear the wrapping paper. Design of the shoe box is that it suppresses the sound made during that moment. The giver g of this shoebox promisses the receiver r that it will be a surprise whether or not the package is unwrapped u or wrapped w when the box is opened.
    On the seventh day it is not a surprise because r then knows it will be u. But if g puts the counter to 6, r cannot open the box on the 6th day because he knows that it can't be seven and five days are pastso the counter must be on 6.

    It seems that g cannot keep his promise. If r opens the box after three days there is 50% change on w and 50% chance on u. Is that a schrodinger shoe box or not?
     
  5. Nov 7, 2008 #4
    WOW WOW WOW that is way to complicated. i just need a simple relate rates problem. but like can someon make one up for bowling or for something creative! please! but the calculus derivative part can be simple!!!!!!!!!!!! PLEASE HELP ME!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  6. Nov 7, 2008 #5

    Dick

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Demanding a suggestion for a "creative" problem is a little, uh, uncreative. If you have vast creative resources like pipe cleaners and play-doh and toy figures, why don't you concentrate on them for the creative part. Chose a simple related rates problem and illustrate it creatively. I mean just put a light bulb in the corner of the box and talk about how the rate of change of the length of the shadow depends on how fast you are moving towards the light and how far you are from the light. Now think of a creative scenario.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2008
  7. Nov 8, 2008 #6
    yes thank you dick, but that is the problem. the shadow concept it so commonly used. that is why i need a new related rates problem, its not the stuff i make the BOX out of. like i need an example of how you could do related rates with bowling or what not.
     
  8. Nov 17, 2008 #7
    Hi. I actually have to do this exact project in my calculus class, and the teacher is counting this as a test grade, so it is a pretty big project. Anyway, I really need help in developing a situation for a related rate word problem. If anyone could help, that would be really great.
    Thanks
     
  9. Nov 18, 2008 #8
    as you problably have seen from my former suggestion I live with the question:

    What is a related rate word problem?
     
  10. Nov 18, 2008 #9
    SOLVED!! how do i make it say that this thread is solved.??
     
  11. Nov 18, 2008 #10

    Dick

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    So what DID you put in your shoebox?
     
  12. Nov 19, 2008 #11
    i did my own creative idea. sorry im not sharing. i don't want anyone to have it. SORRY.
    so again, how do you make this say [SOLVED]?
     
  13. Nov 19, 2008 #12

    Dick

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I don't know. Isn't it under Thread Tools? I don't see it, but then I didn't start the thread.
     
  14. Nov 20, 2008 #13
    That seems pretty poor to me. Asking for others to share their ideas and then not sharing your own....
     
  15. Nov 20, 2008 #14
    Can't you record a *.wav file with a microfone?
     
  16. Nov 23, 2008 #15
    well Callahan, if you read the thread properly, no one shared thier ideas with me, so I am not willing to share mine. you have no room to talk.
     
  17. Nov 23, 2008 #16
    Dear physicsBhelp
    No-one asked: what is a related rate word problem! If you don't want to say how you solved your problem OK But why not help if some-one, OK perhaps a little too late asks you what was the problem in the first place?
    No-one says ugh.
     
  18. Nov 28, 2008 #17
    Oh my gosh, a relate rate word problem has to do with Calculus. Anyone who has ever studied Calculus should know what related rates are!!! and what a word problem is, just put them together. It's like a math problem in Calculus (speficially related rates meaing using derivatives). And your post doesn't even make sense. i Know no one asked what a related rate problem was because everyone knew, so why are you bringing that up. and no one has asked for help!
     
  19. Dec 2, 2008 #18
    You're very friendly, physicsbhelp.
     
  20. Dec 3, 2008 #19
    Thanks Rochfor1, so are you.
     
  21. Dec 3, 2008 #20
    Im glad you think so.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Calculus Shoebox (help create a creative yet simple problem)
Loading...