Can physicists (applied physics or engineering physics) work in robotics field?

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  • #1
Can physicists (applied physics or engineering physics) work in robotics field??

Im currently in high school and graduating this december,,,, i love physics and robotics,, so i want to do physics in college (not ME or EE)... but after i graduate in college,,, am i qualified to be a robotics engineer/pioneer?? like in defence industry or something?? also, are physicists qualified to be a computer programmer???
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Qualifications don't matter so much, skills do.

Okay, in the grandiose world of full-time jobs this isn't always the case. In general, however, I would advise not worrying so much about your qualifications and worrying much more about your skillset. CAN you create electronic circuits? DO you understand a bit about artificial intelligence? ARE you a programmer already?

If you can answer yes to all of these, you can work in the field of robotics. If you can't, take some classes to improve the areas you're still weak in, and then you're ready to go. Majoring in physics is probably not the worst idea you could come up with - I remember that my university offered in classes in 'device physics', 'microcontroller programming' and 'artificial intelligence' for physics majors. Go for it!
 
  • #3


wow!!! well,, I guess ur right,, skills are the most important things (and also qualification). Let me rephrase ur comment: Physicists can work as robotics engineer. Well then, guess I have to improve my programming skills, CAD (for designing robotic structures), soldering/making microchips and stuff, and the most important thing,, maths and physics @ university \m/!!!!!!! tnx!!!!!!!!!
 
  • #4
128
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*smiles* Glad to be of service. ;)
 
  • #5


yo,, ur name is hobin rite? I just wanna ask, is physics really hard in university,, n btw I really got limited amount of knowledge in physics!!!!!!! T_T any tips (study, habit, time management and etc.)????!!!!??
 
  • #6
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Well, technically, my name is Robin. (And my surname starts with an 'H', yup.) And, uhm, I'm a triple major in physics, mathematics and chemistry, and I think math is hardest. Then comes physics. And then comes chemistry.

Seriously, though, I may not be the person you should ask. I have virtually -breathed- natural science since I was born. ;) Sure, college can be a pain in the ***, but this MIGHT be true for most majors (which I don't believe.) In general, yes, you can expect physics to be a pretty hard major when compared to, say, literature.

Also, read this. I think you will find it very useful.
 
  • #7
17
0


Well, technically, my name is Robin. (And my surname starts with an 'H', yup.) And, uhm, I'm a triple major in physics, mathematics and chemistry, and I think math is hardest. Then comes physics. And then comes chemistry.

Seriously, though, I may not be the person you should ask. I have virtually -breathed- natural science since I was born. ;) Sure, college can be a pain in the ***, but this MIGHT be true for most majors (which I don't believe.) In general, yes, you can expect physics to be a pretty hard major when compared to, say, literature.

Also, read http://www.paulgraham.com/college.html. I think you will find it very useful.
So basically, you're the master of universe!!
loool jk

I am stunned!
What you do in life!???
Millionaire already!??
Do you make research in your spare time?From wich field?

At what age did you obtained that triple major!?

Hope im not being very curious?
 
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  • #8
59
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If you want to do robotics...your best bet will(probably) be electrical engineering. Some universities have mechatronics concentrations within the ME or EE department. Of course, an in depth knowledge of physical interactions and mathematical structures will help you anywhere, skills will come first with robotics as Hobin mentioned. These skills are usually acquired from time in labs and doing projects in engineering. I think if you insist on studying physics, then at the least you should double major in an area of engineering(such as computer/electrical, mechanical).

Computer programming skills can be picked up in a physics or engineering major. More and more often programming is necessary so by the time you complete either or both of these degrees, you will most likely be fluent in at least 1 programming language.
 

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