Carbon 14 Volatility: Ease of Dislodging from Graphite & Diamond

In summary, carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope that can be released from stable forms of elemental carbon through processes such as burning or chemical reactions, but the amount released is likely to be minimal. The efficiency of dislodging carbon from the surface and the differences between graphite and diamond in this aspect are not clear without further research or expertise.
  • #1
snorkack
2,190
477
How readily does carbon 14 volatilize from (meta)stable forms of elemental carbon?
Both graphite and diamond burn in hot air but are very stable in contact with cold air.
Carbon 14 has maximum decay energy of 159 keV.
At that energy, the electrons are stopped by 20 cm of air, or about 0,2 mm of water/tissue. Skin stops 89% of carbon 14 radiation, and cloth/gloves all of it.
The recoil energy of N-14 is by my estimate maximum of 6 eV, so it gets nowhere.
But how efficient are 159 keV electrons in dislodging C atoms from surface of carbon, such that they do oxidize in air to CO2, which can then be inhaled and incorporated in body?

Presumably, the activity of the surface of carbon is proportional to the square of concentration of C-14, right? The intensity of beta radiation and thus the amount of C atoms dislodged from surface into air is proportional to one power, and the probability that an atom if dislodged is C-14 one is proportional to the other power.
How much does the ease of dislodging carbon from surface differ between graphite and diamond?
 
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  • #2
snorkack said:
how efficient are 159 keV electrons in dislodging C atoms from surface of carbon, such that they do oxidize in air to CO2, which can then be inhaled and incorporated in body?
snorkack said:
How much does the ease of dislodging carbon from surface differ between graphite and diamond?
Presumably this is for 14C? Have you actually considered the energies, and ages of the two allotropes?
 
  • #3


As an internet forum user, I am not a scientist or expert in this field, so I cannot give a definitive answer to this question. However, based on my understanding, carbon 14 is a radioactive isotope and therefore it is constantly decaying and emitting radiation. This means that it is not stable and will eventually decay into a stable form of carbon.

In terms of volatilization, it is possible for some carbon 14 to be released from stable forms of elemental carbon, such as graphite and diamond, through processes such as burning or chemical reactions. However, the amount of carbon 14 released in this way would be very small compared to the total amount of carbon 14 present in the sample.

The amount of carbon 14 released from the surface of carbon would depend on factors such as the concentration of carbon 14, the intensity of beta radiation, and the properties of the surface of the carbon. I am not familiar with the specific values for these factors, so I cannot comment on the efficiency of dislodging carbon from the surface.

In terms of the difference between graphite and diamond, I would imagine that the ease of dislodging carbon from their surfaces would depend on the structure and composition of each material. However, again, I cannot provide a specific answer without further research or expertise in this area.

Overall, it is important to remember that carbon 14 is a naturally occurring isotope and it is constantly decaying and being replenished in the environment. While it is important to be cautious about exposure to high levels of radiation, the amount of carbon 14 released from stable forms of elemental carbon is likely to be minimal and not a cause for significant concern.
 

Related to Carbon 14 Volatility: Ease of Dislodging from Graphite & Diamond

1. What is Carbon 14 volatility?

Carbon 14 volatility refers to the ease at which carbon 14 atoms can be dislodged from graphite and diamond structures. This is an important factor in understanding the stability and reactivity of these materials.

2. How is carbon 14 volatility measured?

Carbon 14 volatility can be measured through experiments that expose graphite and diamond samples to high temperatures and observe the amount of carbon 14 atoms that are released. This can also be measured indirectly through other techniques such as mass spectrometry.

3. What factors can affect carbon 14 volatility?

The main factors that can affect carbon 14 volatility include temperature, pressure, and the presence of other elements. High temperatures and pressures can increase the volatility of carbon 14 atoms, while the presence of certain elements can also affect their stability within the graphite and diamond structures.

4. Why is understanding carbon 14 volatility important?

Understanding carbon 14 volatility is important for a variety of reasons. It can help us understand the behavior and reactivity of graphite and diamond materials, which are widely used in various industries. Additionally, understanding carbon 14 volatility is crucial for accurately dating organic materials using carbon dating techniques.

5. How can carbon 14 volatility be controlled?

There are several ways to control carbon 14 volatility, including adjusting the temperature and pressure conditions during production processes, using different types of graphite and diamond materials, and incorporating other elements to stabilize the carbon 14 atoms. Further research is needed to fully understand and control carbon 14 volatility in different contexts.

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