Carbon dioxide has Eyjafjallajokull pumped into the atmosphere

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How much carbon dioxide has Eyjafjallajokull pumped into the atmosphere during the present eruption, compared to the amount not pumped in by aircraft during the recent "no fly" period in Europe?
 

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  • #2
Ivan Seeking
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Eyjafjallajökull Daily CO2 Output Utterly Dwarfed by European Aviation Industry

...As you can see in the big, colorful graph, the European aviation industry's daily CO2 output completely dominates poor Eyjafjallajökull with a daily tally of 344,109 tons of CO2 per day. Compared to the volcano's 15,000 tons, that's quite the difference...
http://gizmodo.com/5519809/eyjafjal...utterly-dwarfed-by-european-aviation-industry

burning one gallon of Jet-A creates just over 21 pounds of CO2, and burning one gallon of AvGas creates just over 22 pounds of CO2. ...
http://www.avbuyer.com/articles/detail.asp?Id=1459
 
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  • #3
arildno
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Eyafjallajokull is a baby volcano.

His big sister, Katla, is a very different sort of beast..

The legendary Swedish author of children's tales, Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), used "Katla" as the name of the dragon in "The Brothers Lionheart"
 
  • #4
Ivan Seeking
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Eyafjallajokull is a baby volcano.

His big sister, Katla, is a very different sort of beast..

The legendary Swedish author of children's tales, Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), used "Katla" as the name of the dragon in "The Brothers Lionheart"

Yellowstone was a very very different sort of beast! Still

The greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most abundant gas (after water) emitted by volcanoes. Volcanologists estimate an annual global output of 200 million tons of volcanic CO2 per year. This natural source is balanced by natural processes that remove CO2 from the atmosphere-specifically by the weathering of rock into soil by atmospheric CO2 dissolved in rain and surface waters.

By comparison, human activities such as the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation produce 130 times more CO2 than all the world's volcanoes put together...
http://www.fs.fed.us/gpnf/press/2001/pr284.htm
 
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  • #5
mgb_phys
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Yellowstone was a very very different sort of beast! Still
Yes but Yellowstone hasn't gone bang for a while (and if it did - delayed flights are going to be the least of your problems)

The last few times Eyjafjallajokull woke up it disturbed it's neighbour
http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/04/subglacial_eruption_underway_a.php [Broken]
 
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  • #6
turbo
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Yes, Katla has made a fuss the last few times that Eyjafjallajokull has roused. Katla is much more dangerous and is being monitored as closely as possible considering that it is buried under a lot of ice. If it goes off, the melt-water volume from the ice cap will likely surpass the volumes of several of the world's greatest rivers combined. The gas and ash will also make little brother look like an afterthought.
 
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arildno
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The correlation between eruptions of Katla and Eyafjallajokull isn't as clear-cut as it looked initially (heard that recently on Norwegian radio from a seismologist).
Besides, Katla DID belch a bit, 50 years ago or so, so she might continue dozing on this time.
 
  • #8
turbo
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The correlation between eruptions of Katla and Eyafjallajokull isn't as clear-cut as it looked initially (heard that recently on Norwegian radio from a seismologist).
Besides, Katla DID belch a bit, 50 years ago or so, so she might continue dozing on this time.
Good news on both counts. News reports here say that Katla is overdue - but that's the news.
 
  • #9
Kerrie
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Tried to a quick search on how difficult it may be for the people in east Iceland (sparsely populated) from reaching the west side of the country. The ring road is the only main route to the more populated western side of Iceland. Their only alternative is to drive the other direction which could be a several day trip.
 
  • #10
arildno
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Eyafjallajokull is rumbling again, it seems, from Norwegian dailies.
 
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Tried to a quick search on how difficult it may be for the people in east Iceland (sparsely populated) from reaching the west side of the country. The ring road is the only main route to the more populated western side of Iceland. Their only alternative is to drive the other direction which could be a several day trip.

From east Iceland (the area around Egilsstadir) it is almost the same distance to Reykjavik if you the north or the south route. The whole circle route is 1336 kms and from Egilsstadir to Reykjavik is around 650 kms or a 7-8 hour drive, not several days.
 
  • #12
arildno
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From east Iceland (the area around Egilsstadir) it is almost the same distance to Reykjavik if you the north or the south route. The whole circle route is 1336 kms and from Egilsstadir to Reykjavik is around 650 kms or a 7-8 hour drive, not several days.

Do you have CARS on Iceland now??

Wow, I thought you still used those cute Iceland ponies to get around with..
 
  • #13
Kerrie
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Do you have CARS on Iceland now??

Wow, I thought you still used those cute Iceland ponies to get around with..
I read actually that Iceland has more cars per capita than most industrialized nations. Maybe due to the fact they don't have great mass transit?
 
  • #14
turbo
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I read actually that Iceland has more cars per capita than most industrialized nations. Maybe due to the fact they don't have great mass transit?
Could be. Maine has a LOT of vehicles per capita because of that very reason. There are a couple of small bus companies running intra-city routes, and there is an Amtrak train out of Portland, but that's it. Around here, it is common for there to be a vehicle for every adult in a household, because people have to travel quite a distance to get to work, shopping, etc.
 
  • #15
arildno
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I read actually that Iceland has more cars per capita than most industrialized nations. Maybe due to the fact they don't have great mass transit?

Probably.

Here in Norway, the highest per capita amount of cars is in northernmost Norway, the Finnmark.

It is a huge area, very sparsely inhabited, except by reindeer and mosquitoes.

And generally, they don't use buses..:smile:
 
  • #16
mgb_phys
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Not only do they have cars, they don't limit them to driving on land

 
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  • #18
Kerrie
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Thanks for the link!
 

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