Career advice for a nuclear postdoc?

In summary: Graduate school is filled with so many foreign students and none of them will be getting any of those jobs.
  • #1
Kochia
6
4
Hi!

I am on my way to complete a two-year postdoc. I have BSc, MSc and PhD in nuclear engineering. My research focuses are severe accident analysis, thermal-hydraulics and CFD. Since it is very likely that my current employer cannot ensure a future temporary/permanent position, I am looking for new job opportunities. Here are some questions to which I wish I could get some advice from you:

1. I tried to search for the job openings that matched my skill sets and background online (websites such as Indeed and Glassdoor). However, there were few posts to which I feel confident enough to submit my CV. What jobs do you think I am eligible for?

2. I am very interested in living and working in UK. However, I doubt that I could find any positions if I were to stay in my research field. Any information on situation of nuclear industry or academia in UK?

Thank you in advance for possible advice!

Kochia
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I would submit your application to any job that even partially matches your skills. It may be that the employer will decide to grab you knowing how difficult it would be to find someone with all the skills needed.

I knew someone once who lost an opportunity once because they felt they didn't "know" something well enough even though they did candidate (confidence or naively excluding opportunities ) and said so at the interview but upon a second interview got hired.
 
  • #3
jedishrfu said:
I would submit your application to any job that even partially matches your skills. It may be that the employer will decide to grab you knowing how difficult it would be to find someone with all the skills needed.

I knew someone once who lost an opportunity once because they felt they didn't "know" something well enough even though they did candidate (confidence or naively excluding opportunities ) and said so at the interview but upon a second interview got hired.

Thanks for the reply! Well, guess I took it for granted that one should be fully or mostly qualified for the job to get a better chance for interview.
 
  • #4
What is "fully or mostly qualified"? The job descriptions list the ideal candidate. The ideal candidate does not exist. There is no one applying who has years of experience in every single topic mentioned in the job description. If you match 2/3 of the list, including at least some of the technical parts, you are already a great candidate. If you match 1/2 you might still be a good candidate.
 
  • Like
Likes Kochia
  • #5
It's actually pretty absurd what some employers list as required skills for jobs. In some defense areas you can only get hired if you know X but you only will ever know X if you get hired(as X is exclusively used by the military).
 
  • #6
Qurks said:
It's actually pretty absurd what some employers list as required skills for jobs. In some defense areas you can only get hired if you know X but you only will ever know X if you get hired(as X is exclusively used by the military).
True. But such jobs always require citizenship, which is another (major) hurdle for potential applicants from overseas.
 
  • #7
Kochia said:
True. But such jobs always require citizenship, which is another (major) hurdle for potential applicants from overseas.

Yea, that's one reason I like them.

Graduate school is filled with so many foreign students and none of them will be getting any of those jobs.
 

Related to Career advice for a nuclear postdoc?

1. How can I improve my chances of finding a job as a nuclear postdoc?

The most important thing you can do is to network and make connections in the field. Attend conferences, seminars, and other events to meet potential employers and colleagues. Additionally, make sure your resume and cover letter are tailored to the specific job you are applying for.

2. Should I focus on a specific subfield within nuclear science for my postdoc?

It depends on your career goals and interests. If you have a specific subfield in mind for your future career, it may be beneficial to focus on that area during your postdoc. However, having a broad knowledge base and skill set can also be valuable in the job market.

3. What skills and experience should I highlight on my resume as a nuclear postdoc?

Highlight any research experience, publications, presentations, and technical skills related to nuclear science. Additionally, emphasize any collaborations or leadership roles you have had during your postdoc.

4. How important is it to have industry experience as a nuclear postdoc?

While industry experience can be beneficial, it is not always necessary. Many postdoc positions focus on research and academia, so if that is your desired career path, industry experience may not be as important. However, if you are interested in a career in industry, it can be helpful to gain some experience through internships or collaborations.

5. What resources are available for career development as a nuclear postdoc?

There are many resources available, both within your institution and outside organizations. Your university may have a career center or office for postdoctoral affairs that can provide guidance and workshops. Additionally, professional organizations such as the American Nuclear Society offer career development resources and networking opportunities for nuclear scientists.

Similar threads

Replies
1
Views
447
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
2
Views
326
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
21
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
912
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
5
Views
884
  • STEM Career Guidance
2
Replies
39
Views
4K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
7
Views
481
Back
Top