Ceramic Gas Sensors: Theory & Principles

In summary, the NASA Glenn Chemical Species Gas Sensors Team is developing gas sensing technology for aeronautic and space applications. The sensors presently being developed will allow the detection of hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide in a variety of ambient gas conditions and temperatures. The sensors are microfabricated and micromachined using Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) based technology to minimize size, weight, and power consumption. Nanomaterials are used to improve the sensor response and stability. A temperature detector and a heater are also included in the structure to allow stable sensor operation at a variety of temperatures. The sensor technology development also depends on the use of nanom
  • #1
twinklerip
4
0
Hi...
can anyone tell me where can i find theory about gas sensors (made of ceramics) online? what principles is used to detect the presence of gases?
thank you.
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/chemsensors/
The NASA Glenn Chemical Species Gas Sensors Team is developing gas sensing technology for aeronautic and space applications. The same technology also has a variety of commercial applications. The sensors presently being developed will allow the detection of hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide in a variety of ambient gas conditions and temperatures. The sensors are microfabricated and micromachined using Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) based technology to minimize size, weight, and power consumption. Nanomaterials are used to improve the sensor response and stability. A temperature detector and a heater are also included in the structure to allow stable sensor operation at a variety of temperatures. The sensor technology development also depends on the use of nanomaterials and [Silicon carbide (SiC)] as an electronic semiconductor. Mass fabrication of the sensors using silicon-processing technology is envisioned to minimize the cost per sensor.
http://www.makelengineering.com/dir/Technologies/Microchannel/Microchannel.htm
Microchannel Reactor Technology


http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=839218
Solid-state mixed potential electrochemical sensors sense gases using differential electrocatalysis on dissimilar electrode materials. The response theory is typically expressed in terms of models invoking Butler-Volmer kinetics at high overpotentials (Tafel behavior). This model is not adequate for describing all types of mixed potential sensor responses. For low concentrations of analyte gas, mass transport limitations must also be considered. Experiments with sensors with air reference electrodes also demonstrate the importance of low overpotential oxygen reduction kinetics in establishing the device response. A sensor response model that predicts a linear relationship between response voltage and analyte gas concentration is derived. The development of oxide electrode based devices offers improved long-term response stability over metal electrode based devices.

High-Temperature Ceramic Gas Sensors: A Review
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1744-7402.2006.02084.x?cookieSet=1&journalCode=ijac
Identifying chemical species and their quantification have become important in many industrial applications involving high temperatures and chemical contaminants. Center for Industrial Sensors and Measurements has developed TiO2 semiconducting sensors, zirconia and lithium phosphate-based electrochemical sensors, and a sensor array for high-temperature emission control. The underlying theme in our sensor development has been the use of materials science and chemistry to promote high-temperature performance with selectivity. This article presents key results of previous studies on CO, NOx, CO2, and O2 sensors, and scope for future development.

Center for Industrial Sensors and Measurements (CISM), Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210
http://www.cism.ohio-state.edu/
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #3
Astronuc said:
Center for Industrial Sensors and Measurements (CISM), Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210
http://www.cism.ohio-state.edu/
Ha ha! I was going to look up a link to Dutta's website, but never got to it.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #4
Gokul43201 said:
Ha ha! I was going to look up a link to Dutta's website, but never got to it.
The NASA website for the Glenn Chemical Species Gas Sensors Team links directly to Dutta's page on the CISM website. I was wondering where you were Gokul. I imagine you're quite busy. :wink: :biggrin:
 
  • #5
thanks Astronuc. I'm checking these out.
 

Related to Ceramic Gas Sensors: Theory & Principles

What are ceramic gas sensors?

Ceramic gas sensors are devices used for detecting and measuring the presence of specific gases in the surrounding environment. They are made of ceramic materials that have been specially designed to have high sensitivity and selectivity towards certain gases.

How do ceramic gas sensors work?

Ceramic gas sensors rely on a chemical reaction between the gas being detected and the ceramic material. When the gas comes into contact with the ceramic, it causes a change in the electrical conductivity of the material. This change is then measured and converted into a gas concentration reading.

What are the main principles behind ceramic gas sensors?

The main principles behind ceramic gas sensors include the use of specific ceramic materials that have a high affinity towards certain gases, the use of a heating element to increase the sensitivity of the sensor, and the measurement of electrical conductivity changes to determine gas concentration.

What are the advantages of using ceramic gas sensors?

Ceramic gas sensors have several advantages, including high sensitivity and selectivity towards specific gases, low power consumption, and a fast response time. They are also known for their durability and stability, making them suitable for long-term use.

What are some common applications of ceramic gas sensors?

Ceramic gas sensors are used in a variety of industries and applications, including environmental monitoring, industrial process control, medical diagnostics, and automotive emissions control. They are also commonly used in household gas detectors for carbon monoxide and combustible gases.

Similar threads

  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
12
Views
650
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
7
Views
3K
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
338
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
17
Views
590
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
559
Replies
1
Views
347
Replies
19
Views
1K
Replies
8
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
2K
Back
Top