Chemistry or Physics for Materials Science

In summary, it is recommended to major in one subject and take upper level courses in both subjects. For example, a physics major can still take important courses in chemistry, such as organic chemistry and advanced inorganic chemistry. It is also suggested to consider the requirements of materials science graduate programs and tailor your program of study accordingly. Additionally, it is worth considering majoring in materials science if that is your desired field, as many universities require a background in physics or chemistry for this program.
  • #1
Riogho
119
0
yepo
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I'd say major in one subject, but take a lot of upper levels in BOTH subjects. Even though I was a physics major, I still took many important courses in chemistry... including 2 terms of organic chemistry, and advanced inorganic chemistry (great labs with coordination compounds!). In fact, I would have received a double major if I'd taken two terms of physical chemistry... but the classes didn't fit in my schedule and I thought there would be too much overlap with thermo and quantum (although I bought the text of the P-chem book for reference). You might want to look at what materials science graduate programs suggest for undergraduate applicants to have taken, and tailor your program of study accordingly.
 
  • #3
Someone has to ask. Why not major in Materials Science if that's what you want to do?
 
  • #4
I've actually applied (in the UK) to a few universities' to study materials science. Almost all said that you needed either physics or chemistry to get in, and go on to study both while you are there. Studying both would be a good idea I guess.
 

Related to Chemistry or Physics for Materials Science

1. What is the difference between chemistry and physics in materials science?

In materials science, chemistry and physics are both fundamental fields of study that contribute to understanding the properties and behavior of materials. Chemistry focuses on the composition, structure, and reactions of materials at the molecular and atomic level, while physics deals with the physical properties and behavior of materials at the macroscopic level. Both chemistry and physics play important roles in materials science, and a combination of the two is often necessary for a comprehensive understanding of materials.

2. Which field is more important for materials science: chemistry or physics?

Both chemistry and physics are equally important for materials science. While chemistry provides a deeper understanding of the chemical composition and behavior of materials, physics helps to explain the physical properties and behavior of materials. Both fields are necessary for a complete understanding of materials and their applications in various industries.

3. How do chemistry and physics contribute to the development of new materials?

Chemistry and physics play crucial roles in the development of new materials. Chemistry is involved in the synthesis and characterization of new materials, while physics helps to understand their physical properties and behavior. By combining the knowledge and techniques from both fields, scientists are able to design and create new materials with specific properties and applications.

4. Can materials science be studied without a background in chemistry or physics?

While a background in chemistry and/or physics is highly beneficial for studying materials science, it is not a requirement. Materials science is an interdisciplinary field, and individuals from various backgrounds such as engineering, biology, and mathematics can also contribute to the study of materials. However, a basic understanding of chemistry and physics is necessary to fully grasp the concepts and principles of materials science.

5. What are some real-world applications of materials science in relation to chemistry and physics?

Materials science has a wide range of applications in various industries, such as electronics, aerospace, energy, and healthcare. For example, the development of new materials with specific electrical, thermal, or magnetic properties relies heavily on the principles of chemistry and physics. Additionally, the study of biomaterials, which involves understanding the interactions between materials and biological systems, also requires knowledge of chemistry and physics.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
921
Replies
4
Views
995
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
16
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
954
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
4
Views
167
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
10
Views
2K
Back
Top