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Chicken Eggs?

  1. Mar 19, 2006 #1
    What are the difference between the eggs we eat and the eggs that hatch a baby chicken?

    Is it possible to predict it just before a chicken lays one?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 19, 2006 #2
    The eggs that hatch a baby chicken has been fertilized, but the once we eat has not been. No it is not possible to perdict before the egg is laid if the hen has not been in isolation.
     
  4. Mar 19, 2006 #3
    So the eggs we eat come from hens that have been isolated from male chickens?
     
  5. Mar 19, 2006 #4
    That is correct.
     
  6. Mar 19, 2006 #5

    Evo

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    Some people actually prefer to eat fertilized eggs. :frown: I've eaten eggs from farms where the chickens were not separated from the roosters. One old farmer used to hold them up to a light to see if they had been fertilized. Which poses the question, how far along is the chick at the time it's laid?
     
  7. Mar 20, 2006 #6

    Phobos

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    (suppresses jr. high school giggle factor)

    http://www.msstate.edu/dept/poultry/avianemb.htm
     
  8. Mar 20, 2006 #7
    I can imagine how fertilized eggs might be more delicious although it might sound disgusiting. It would be like eating tender chicken meat wrapped inside egg shells.
     
  9. Mar 21, 2006 #8

    Evo

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    Hey, my knowledge of chicken eggs is zip. :grumpy: Ok, sounds like less than 24 hours from fertilization. Great site Phobos, I can't wait to work this new information into my next casual conversation. :biggrin:

    I did look up an egg site and it showed after 24 hours of incubation a chicken egg has a visible network of veins. I knew there was a visible difference shortly after they were laid, I just didn't know if there was a visible difference at the time they were laid.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2006
  10. Mar 21, 2006 #9

    DocToxyn

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    I don't think Phobos was giggling at your potential lack of poultry knowledge (I'm sure you know some good recipes though), he just read further into your question than you intended. Let's see it again shall we...

     
  11. Mar 21, 2006 #10

    Evo

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    :blushing: :devil: :blushing:

    Well, *my* mind is not in the gutter. o:)
     
  12. Mar 21, 2006 #11

    DocToxyn

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    Hey, this is the Biology section you know. :wink: o:)
     
  13. Mar 22, 2006 #12

    Phobos

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    Yep, that was my mind in the gutter. Sorry! :redface:
    This is what happens when one is no longer a mentor.
     
  14. Mar 23, 2006 #13

    Moonbear

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    Sometimes if you do get a fertilized egg, you'll notice the yolk is a bit bloody. If you can see a chick in it, don't eat it! :biggrin:

    The tricky part with chickens is they store the sperm, so can be with a rooster just a short time and have fertile eggs for a month or so (I'd have to look up how long exactly...it's been way too long since I've needed to think about poultry reproduction).
     
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