Chicken Eggs?

  • Thread starter pivoxa15
  • Start date
  • #1
2,255
1

Main Question or Discussion Point

What are the difference between the eggs we eat and the eggs that hatch a baby chicken?

Is it possible to predict it just before a chicken lays one?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
344
0
The eggs that hatch a baby chicken has been fertilized, but the once we eat has not been. No it is not possible to perdict before the egg is laid if the hen has not been in isolation.
 
  • #3
2,255
1
So the eggs we eat come from hens that have been isolated from male chickens?
 
  • #4
344
0
pivoxa15 said:
So the eggs we eat come from hens that have been isolated from male chickens?
That is correct.
 
  • #5
Evo
Mentor
23,103
2,448
Some people actually prefer to eat fertilized eggs. :frown: I've eaten eggs from farms where the chickens were not separated from the roosters. One old farmer used to hold them up to a light to see if they had been fertilized. Which poses the question, how far along is the chick at the time it's laid?
 
  • #6
Phobos
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,939
6
how far along is the chick at the time it's laid?
(suppresses jr. high school giggle factor)

http://www.msstate.edu/dept/poultry/avianemb.htm [Broken]
Cell division begins soon after fertilization, even while the rest of the egg is being formed. Cell division will continue if the egg is kept warmer than 67oF. The first cell division is completed about the time the egg enters the isthmus. Additional cell divisions take place about every 20 minutes; so, by the time of lay, several thousand cells form two layers of cells called a "gastrula."

At this time the egg is laid, it cools, and embryonic development usually stops until proper environmental conditions are established for incubation. After incubation begins, the cellular growth resumes. At first, all the cells are alike, but as the embryo develops, cell differences are observed. Some cells may become vital organs; others become a wing or leg.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #7
2,255
1
Evo said:
Some people actually prefer to eat fertilized eggs. :frown: I've eaten eggs from farms where the chickens were not separated from the roosters. One old farmer used to hold them up to a light to see if they had been fertilized. Which poses the question, how far along is the chick at the time it's laid?
I can imagine how fertilized eggs might be more delicious although it might sound disgusiting. It would be like eating tender chicken meat wrapped inside egg shells.
 
  • #8
Evo
Mentor
23,103
2,448
Phobos said:
(suppresses jr. high school giggle factor)

http://www.msstate.edu/dept/poultry/avianemb.htm [Broken]
Hey, my knowledge of chicken eggs is zip. :grumpy: Ok, sounds like less than 24 hours from fertilization. Great site Phobos, I can't wait to work this new information into my next casual conversation. :biggrin:

I did look up an egg site and it showed after 24 hours of incubation a chicken egg has a visible network of veins. I knew there was a visible difference shortly after they were laid, I just didn't know if there was a visible difference at the time they were laid.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #9
DocToxyn
Science Advisor
424
0
Evo said:
Hey, my knowledge of chicken eggs is zip. :grumpy:
I don't think Phobos was giggling at your potential lack of poultry knowledge (I'm sure you know some good recipes though), he just read further into your question than you intended. Let's see it again shall we...

Evo said:
how far along is the chick at the time it's laid?:devil: :tongue2:
 
  • #10
Evo
Mentor
23,103
2,448
DocToxyn said:
I don't think Phobos was giggling at your potential lack of poultry knowledge (I'm sure you know some good recipes though), he just read further into your question than you intended. Let's see it again shall we...
:blushing: :devil: :blushing:

Well, *my* mind is not in the gutter. o:)
 
  • #11
DocToxyn
Science Advisor
424
0
Evo said:
:blushing: :devil: :blushing:

Well, *my* mind is not in the gutter. o:)
Hey, this is the Biology section you know. :wink: o:)
 
  • #12
Phobos
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,939
6
Yep, that was my mind in the gutter. Sorry! :redface:
This is what happens when one is no longer a mentor.
 
  • #13
Moonbear
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,490
51
Evo said:
Hey, my knowledge of chicken eggs is zip. :grumpy: Ok, sounds like less than 24 hours from fertilization. Great site Phobos, I can't wait to work this new information into my next casual conversation. :biggrin:

I did look up an egg site and it showed after 24 hours of incubation a chicken egg has a visible network of veins. I knew there was a visible difference shortly after they were laid, I just didn't know if there was a visible difference at the time they were laid.
Sometimes if you do get a fertilized egg, you'll notice the yolk is a bit bloody. If you can see a chick in it, don't eat it! :biggrin:

The tricky part with chickens is they store the sperm, so can be with a rooster just a short time and have fertile eggs for a month or so (I'd have to look up how long exactly...it's been way too long since I've needed to think about poultry reproduction).
 

Related Threads for: Chicken Eggs?

Replies
52
Views
12K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
7K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
18K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Last Post
3
Replies
59
Views
9K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
1K
Top