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Circular Motion Conceptual Physics - Space Station

  1. Oct 12, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Suppose you are standing within the rim of a circular space station, in outer space. The rim revolves around the center of the space station at 290 m/s. If the radius of the station is 8784 meters, what will you weigh? (Hint: Find v^2/r and compare it to g.)


    2. Relevant equations
    v^2/r=a
    F=m*v^2/r
    a=(4╥^2)/t^2


    3. The attempt at a solution
    2902 m/s /8784 m =9.57 m/s2 What do I do with this now?
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 12, 2009 #2

    Nabeshin

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    Science Advisor

    I quote from your original statement of the problem:
    Since you've done the first part, now go for the second.
     
  4. Oct 12, 2009 #3
    ok. How do I compare it to g? Isn't 9.57 m/s2 g? I know the acceleration of gravity on earth is 9.81 m/s2. I am stuck on how I am supposed to compare it to find my mass?
     
  5. Oct 12, 2009 #4

    Nabeshin

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    Right, g is ~9.81m/s^2. And for your acceleration, you get 9.57m/s^2. How do the two compare? You're looking for a statement like: The acceleration is .75 x g (.75 made up), or simply .75g. And since g determines weight on earth, you can figure out your "weight" in this accelerating environment from the same conversion factor.
     
  6. Oct 14, 2009 #5
    Okay thanks a lot!:smile:
     
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