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Classification of the equation

  1. May 25, 2015 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Here is the equation:
    Безымянный.png
    2. Relevant equations
    What kind of equation is it(homogenous linear, unhomogenous linear, quazilinear...)
    3. The attempt at a solution
    I suppose it is a homogenous linear one...
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 25, 2015 #2

    Ray Vickson

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    Define "linear" (in a pde context). Does the equation fit that description?
     
  4. May 25, 2015 #3

    SteamKing

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    Also, look up "homogeneous" in the context of describing equations.

    Also, "inhomogeneous" is how to characterize an equation which is not homogeneous, and an equation which is "quasilinear" depends on its particular form.
     
  5. May 25, 2015 #4
    Thank You!
    I've looked up. Here is something from Wikipedia:
    Безымянный.png
    So, I stick to my opinion it is linear.
    But I can't so far decide about it being homogenous... In one Wiki article I read: diff. equation containing non-zero free term in the right part of the equation. This term must be independent on the unknown functions.
     
  6. May 25, 2015 #5

    SteamKing

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    IDK about the Wiki article you read, 'cuz you didn't provide a link. o_O

    There is one characteristic about a homogeneous equation, which can be determined by merely glancing at it, however. :wink:
     
  7. May 25, 2015 #6
    Ok, so if we have some g(t) and f(t) in the right part of the eq., then it is inhomogenous, right?
     
  8. May 25, 2015 #7

    SteamKing

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    Yep.
     
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