Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Clever Method/tool remove wire from breadboard no distortion?

  1. Jul 6, 2015 #1
    Distortion I mean -> bending, curling

    Basically, I'll pull out a wire with my finger nail or a single claw from the oscilloscope probe. Unless the wire is short, it will often bend or distort in the process. There must be a much smarter way to do this. One way I thought was if there was someway to have two oscilloscope probes parallel to each other. What would be some clever small tools or methods to pull out wires perfectly with no bending or curling? There must be a simple solution. If your answer is "just use your fingers" then please don't respond because I am actually looking for an answer and don't want to make people think the thread has been answered.

    Small tricks when breadboarding have helped me make more consistently neat breadboards.

    This guy had some great tips including using a very small screwdriver to indent wires. The kind of answer I'm hoping to get in this thread is another neat little trick to help you consistently be neat with your wiring.


    This is what I mean by the oscilloscope probe or claw. The metal piece that attaches and claws/grabs onto something
    https://www.google.com/search?q=osc...a=X&ei=L1ObVfGJNNOoyAT086u4Cg&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 6, 2015 #2
    By pull out the wire I mean pull out wire out of the breadboard. Without bending it. So I can preserve its length and shape and easily reuse it for that exact same length later if I'd like to. I've found it useful at least to keep a dumby breadboard on hand whose sole purpose is to hold wires of certain lengths organized so I can just grab one when I need one and reuse quickly

    Tell me what needs clarification if you're confused.

    It's a small thing but I've found that small little things have helped me make my breadboards neater and made breadboarding more enjoyable for me
     
  4. Jul 7, 2015 #3

    jim hardy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    I like these miniature needle nose pliers . The jaws are flexible enough you can grab delicate parts without bending them.

    Sears, Xcelite, Klein all have them. Sears sells a set of 3 different pliers handy for electronic & light electrical work, including this one..
    http://www.sears.com/craftsman-3-pc...673000&pla=&kispla=00945673000P&mktRedirect=y
    http://c.shld.net/rpx/i/s/i/spin/image/spin_prod_843379312?wid=800&hei=800&op_sharpen=1

    Needle nose jaws should meet first at the tip and contact should progress backward toward handles as you tighten your grip.
    Likewise diagonal cutters. Hold them up to a light and check that before you buy. Cheap ones will only frustrate you.

    I have the Sears $18 set and like them fine.
    When i bought mine the handles were yellow and they cost $9 , but there's no inflation, right ?
     
  5. Jul 7, 2015 #4
    1. When you grab the wires in the breadboard with the pliers, where do you like to grab? If you grab one end, you may bend the other. if you grab he middle, you might make a V shape out of the wires if they are long enough.

    "I like these miniature needle nose pliers . The jaws are flexible enough you can grab delicate parts without bending them. "

    2. I'm pretty shocked The jaws are made of durable carbon-steel construction according to the website. That carbon steel will be flexible and bend instead of the wires bending? I'm having difficulty visualizing this

    http://www.sears.com/craftsman-3-pc...&mktRedirect=y&aff=Y&PID=6147466&AID=11042411

    3. "Needle nose jaws should meet first at the tip and contact should progress backward toward handles as you tighten your grip.

    Reference https://www.physicsforums.com/threa...ve-wire-from-breadboard-no-distortion.822235/"

    What is the "tip" and what is the "contact ? What do you mean by progress back towards handles? So my hands should be slipping on the handles like my hands are sweaty?
     
  6. Jul 7, 2015 #5

    jim hardy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    1. I grab them right at the breadboard, at top of hole where they're inserted.

    2. The flexible jaws allow a little movement as you squeeze the handle. That's "tactile feedback" and you quickly get the feel of it.

    3.
    Look at this picture of a needle nose plier with its jaws just closed. Tip is at the left end.

    711tsJLcrEL._SL1500_.jpg

    Do you see that the jaws touch one another only at the tip? That's contact.
    If you held the plier up to a window you'd see daylight between the jaws over the remainder of their length.
    If the jaws' first contact is anywhere short of the tip, either they are bent from abuse or the plier is so el-cheapo the manufacturer doesn't mind making junk.

    As you squeeze the handle the jaws deflect.
    Press the fingertips of your left hand against those of your right and push your hands toward one another.
    Your fingers will lay against one another. The jaws do same thing.

    Surely you jest.

    Another thought - you might find a hemostat to your liking. I keep one handy for breadboarding.

    http://www.pjtool.com/images/products/detail/4356.jpg [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  7. Jul 7, 2015 #6

    meBigGuy

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    good needle point tweezers, approaching from the side parallel to the breadboard. grab as close to the breadboard as possible and gently lift.
    use two if you want to lift both ends at the same time. Or, if you bend your wires flat, insert at the bend and lift.

    There are all sorts of tweezers to fit however you dress your wires.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQV7vYeaLsW-MuOhqR7AXTFLSvS8gzymVAJvU8b7gRF0AhOvNI2.jpg
    or, these curved tweezers

    upload_2015-7-7_2-2-8.jpeg

    Or these blunt ones:

    upload_2015-7-7_2-8-10.jpeg
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Clever Method/tool remove wire from breadboard no distortion?
Loading...