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Coefficient of Friction when applied force is not horizontal to surface?

  1. Oct 16, 2007 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    What would happen to the coefficient of friction if the applied force was not horizontal to the surface?

    2. Relevant equations
    Ff=[tex]_{\mu}[/tex]Fn


    3. The attempt at a solution

    I am unsure of how to proceed with this question, but I am thinking that you can't have friction against a vertical surface.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 16, 2007 #2

    stewartcs

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    See below...stupid touchpad makes my computer do wierd things when I'm not ready for it to!
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2007
  4. Oct 16, 2007 #3

    stewartcs

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    Frictional force may certainly exist on a vertical surface.

    If by horizontal you mean normal to the surface then...

    Ff = mu*Fn

    Does Ff remain constant? No...it varies with mu and Fn. So what is mu dependant on? The two surfaces in contact! As the normal force changes, only the resultant frictional force varies, the coefficient of friction is constant between two surfaces and depends on the materials properties.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2007
  5. Feb 9, 2012 #4
    Well if u r nt apllying force in the horizontal direction u cn apply it in vertical direction bt if u aplly it perpendicular no friction takes place !! bt if u apply it with an angle u need to resolve vectors od cosθ and sinθ and hence find ur ans
     
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