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Compton Shift and energy of scattered x-rays

  1. Dec 16, 2012 #1
    X-rays with a wavelength of 0.2x10^-9 m collide with a target.
    The scattered X-rays experience a Compton shift of 0.0007x10^-9 m.
    What is the energy of the scattered X-rays?


    Just wondering what equations I would use here etc?

    Any help would be much appreciated, thanks.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 16, 2012 #2

    mfb

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    Can you determine the wavelength of the scattered X-rays?
    Do you know how wavelength and energy of a photon are related?

    I think there is a minus sign missing in your exponents.
     
  4. Dec 16, 2012 #3
    Yeah sorry there was meant to be minus signs in there,
    E=hc/lambda is the relationship between the energy and wavelength i think.
    I know of this formula: λo=λ' - (h/Mo*c)*(1-cosθ) but then i dont know what exactly to do with it
     
  5. Dec 16, 2012 #4

    mfb

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    You don't need that second formula, as the wavelength shift is given.

    If the initial wavelength of 0.2 * 10^(-9) m increases by 0.0007 * 10^(-9) m, what is the new wavelength?

    Your formula for the energy is right.
     
  6. Dec 16, 2012 #5
    So I just add the wavelengths and plug that into the energy formula with the other two constants?
     
  7. Dec 16, 2012 #6

    mfb

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    That will give you the correct answer, right.
     
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