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Computer science and physics double major with math minor?

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  • Thread starter Themaster123
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  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Is it managable?What are your thougths?First post btw.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
berkeman
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Welcome to the PF.

What are your career goals that lead you to consider that course of study? Just curious. :smile:
 
  • #3
Research postions in quantum computing,artificial intelligence etc.Not exactly sure rigth now.
 
  • #4
Choppy
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That sounds ambitious in my opinion, but it's always difficult to tell. A lot really depends on the specifics of the program(s), how you learn, and what your other commitments are. With respect to the latter points, you may not really know those details until you get there.

Some points to consider...
  1. Make an appointment and talk this over with your academic advisor if you have one. This person will be a lot more familiar with your specific school, program, courses, etc. than random people on the internet.

  2. Think about what you really want out of your education. It's not a game where the person who comes out with the most credentials wins. One of the big reasons to consider a double major is to keep graduate school options open in both subjects when you are finished. There may be other reasons for a double major in computer science and physics - maybe you want to keep physics grad school open, but keep your employment options open for positions requiring a computer science degree as well. But how does the math minor fit into all of that? Will it gain you anything in the end?

  3. Take some time and plan out your courses if you take this path (or others). Look through the course calendar and choose your courses as you would. What electives will you have open? What courses are ones that you would not be interested in, but need for each major?

  4. One of the consequences of double majors or minors is that you tend to sacrifice flexibility in course options for the credential. This can be fine if given all options, these courses are the ones that you would want to take, but many people need/want a little more variety in their education. Personally I found I learned best when I had at least one non-STEM course in my bag for the semester. Others find they learn better when completely immersed in STEM courses.

  5. Kind of a 4b, you also have to consider the consequences on your GPA. If you're overloading, for example, that can hurt your GPA unless you are extremely good at time management and self-discipline. It looks better to have a high GPA in a single major than a mediocre one in a double major when it comes to graduate and scholarship applications.

  6. What decisions do you have to make right NOW? It may be possible to enroll in a single major for your first year and take courses that will also qualify you for the CS major as well. A lot of STEM programs have fairly common first year requirements. This can let you gauge whether or not committing to an ambitious program is a good idea for you.
 
  • #5
berkeman
Mentor
56,431
6,349
Research postions in quantum computing,artificial intelligence etc.Not exactly sure rigth now.
I just noticed in your Profile page that you are 15 y/o and in high school. Normally that would make you a freshman, but if you skipped some grades you may be in the middle of applying to universities. What year in high school are you?

If you are a few years away from heading off to college, I'd recommend just learning lots about the fields you are interested in for now. Read about current research activities in those fields, and find things that are exciting to learn more about. Then start learning about the backgrounds of the researchers and scientists who are doing that work. That may help you to start forming a more concrete idea of the path you want to take at university.

Keep up the interest in STEM, and be sure to participate in sports and extracurricular activities in high school. IMO, it's good to stay well rounded, especially in high school. :smile:
 
  • #6
Thanks for each advice.
 
  • #7
That sounds ambitious in my opinion, but it's always difficult to tell. A lot really depends on the specifics of the program(s), how you learn, and what your other commitments are. With respect to the latter points, you may not really know those details until you get there.

Some points to consider...
  1. Make an appointment and talk this over with your academic advisor if you have one. This person will be a lot more familiar with your specific school, program, courses, etc. than random people on the internet.

  2. Think about what you really want out of your education. It's not a game where the person who comes out with the most credentials wins. One of the big reasons to consider a double major is to keep graduate school options open in both subjects when you are finished. There may be other reasons for a double major in computer science and physics - maybe you want to keep physics grad school open, but keep your employment options open for positions requiring a computer science degree as well. But how does the math minor fit into all of that? Will it gain you anything in the end?

  3. Take some time and plan out your courses if you take this path (or others). Look through the course calendar and choose your courses as you would. What electives will you have open? What courses are ones that you would not be interested in, but need for each major?

  4. One of the consequences of double majors or minors is that you tend to sacrifice flexibility in course options for the credential. This can be fine if given all options, these courses are the ones that you would want to take, but many people need/want a little more variety in their education. Personally I found I learned best when I had at least one non-STEM course in my bag for the semester. Others find they learn better when completely immersed in STEM courses.

  5. Kind of a 4b, you also have to consider the consequences on your GPA. If you're overloading, for example, that can hurt your GPA unless you are extremely good at time management and self-discipline. It looks better to have a high GPA in a single major than a mediocre one in a double major when it comes to graduate and scholarship applications.

  6. What decisions do you have to make right NOW? It may be possible to enroll in a single major for your first year and take courses that will also qualify you for the CS major as well. A lot of STEM programs have fairly common first year requirements. This can let you gauge whether or not committing to an ambitious program is a good idea for you.
I know that It can hurt my gpa,But it may open more academic/professional opportunitites.Actually, I am 2 years away from collage and would be able to decide in this time period.Thanks for advice again!
 
  • #8
I just noticed in your Profile page that you are 15 y/o and in high school. Normally that would make you a freshman, but if you skipped some grades you may be in the middle of applying to universities. What year in high school are you?

If you are a few years away from heading off to college, I'd recommend just learning lots about the fields you are interested in for now. Read about current research activities in those fields, and find things that are exciting to learn more about. Then start learning about the backgrounds of the researchers and scientists who are doing that work. That may help you to start forming a more concrete idea of the path you want to take at university.

Keep up the interest in STEM, and be sure to participate in sports and extracurricular activities in high school. IMO, it's good to stay well rounded, especially in high school. :smile:
Thanks for advice!I am going to listen to your advice(s)I think,they seem logical.Btw,I am very close to finishing 2nd year,then only 3rd and 4th years left to graduate.
 
  • #9
208
20
Hello there!!

Upon reading the above replies I noticed that you haven't yet taken any course on the subjects and that you are not in university yet. I think that in your first year there take a course in each of those fields and see if you like it or not. People change in college. I wanted to do a physics and computer science double major but I preferred math. So you should never go there with a fixed plan in your head that you want to achieve. Keep your options open and go with the flow of your preferences.

Hope this helps!
And good luck.
 
  • #10
Hello there!!

Upon reading the above replies I noticed that you haven't yet taken any course on the subjects and that you are not in university yet. I think that in your first year there take a course in each of those fields and see if you like it or not. People change in college. I wanted to do a physics and computer science double major but I preferred math. So you should never go there with a fixed plan in your head that you want to achieve. Keep your options open and go with the flow of your preferences.

Hope this helps!
And good luck.
thanks for your time!I'll keep my options open.
 

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