Computer term: what's this called?

  • Thread starter Acuben
  • Start date
  • #1
63
0
2 issues.

1. I don't know what this is called. unicode or something? allow me to explain.
I opened a notepad. Typed something in Korean and saved it long time ago. Now I switched regional settings to Japanese. I opened the notepad I saved long time ago and the text is now shown in Japanese (and I need to read it in Korean). I do NOT mean it translated the word in Japanese in its meaning. It seems like same sets of code is used as encryption for both Korean and Japanese so that the code that is supposed to decrypted in Korean is decrypted in Japanese?
What is this encryption of language(other than English) used on computer called?

2. Whatever the word for number 1 is, is there a website that could re-encrypt the Japanese word and decrypt it again in Korean?


--
I tried microsoft applocal, but no luck there. (it seems like it's mainly designed for .exe programs and not for vista)
yes changing regional settings back to Korean is one method, but meh.

Some computer background: vistaHome SP1 32bit OS, x86.
other than that, low specs
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
673
2
Oh man, what you're talking about is called text encoding and there are dozens (hundreds?) of schemes. There's no transferring it from korean to japanese or vice versa. What happened was the 8 or whatever bits that were mapped to korean characters got remapped to Japanese ones. Unicode is a type of encoding scheme, but if your text had been encoded in unicode the character set shouldn't change when you switch regional settings. So possible solutions:
a) mess around with the encoding settings in office
b) download notepad++, paste your text in, and go through the encoding menu until your glyphs start looking like they're in Korean

.exe programs are executables-they run on all variants of windows.
 
  • #3
63
0
hey thanks, I was able to open it with microsoft2007 and was able to partially retrieve some of the information... after lot of time spent ^^ turns out, I can just open file with microsoft word directly >_> took me a while to figure that out. It still wasn't perfect decryption, but enough to understand.
 
  • #4
rcgldr
Homework Helper
8,770
569
Unicode is a 16 bit code that eliminates the overlapping of character sets. With unicode you could have a single text file that includes several languages.
 

Related Threads on Computer term: what's this called?

  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
6K
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Last Post
6
Replies
125
Views
8K
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
45
Views
3K
Replies
4
Views
3K
Replies
18
Views
3K
Top