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Conductive Silicon Carbide [Carborundum]

  1. Feb 19, 2016 #1
    I am trying to create a conductive Silicon Carbide (SiC) heating element.

    The US patent 650234 "Process of making carborundum articles", filed in 1899 states essentially that crushed SiC crystals can be be glued together (using diluted glue) then sintered. It states that the addition of 15-20% graphite is added when conductivity is desired.

    Is this the same process used to create SiC heater elements today? In other words, if I sinter a quantity of SiC crystals with 20% graphite added, then sinter at 2000C, can I expect to be able to use the resulting SiC as a resistive heater element? Any recommended sintering aids?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 24, 2016 #2
    Thanks for the post! This is an automated courtesy bump. Sorry you aren't generating responses at the moment. Do you have any further information, come to any new conclusions or is it possible to reword the post?
     
  4. Mar 1, 2016 #3

    TeethWhitener

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