Convert moment force at lever support

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of reducing or eliminating torque on a clamp holding a lever with a mass at one end. The options of balancing forces or converting the rotational torque into linear force are explored, with the suggestion of using a mechanism at the clamp to convert the torque into spring tension. The conversation also mentions the need for a platform or mechanism to keep the lever horizontal regardless of the applied force.
  • #1
Niki
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TL;DR Summary
Is it possible to balance or convert the rotational force felt by a clamp holding a lever?
I am trying to determine if a clamp holding a lever with a mass at one end can experience zero or reduced torque either by balancing the forces or converting the rotational torque into another form such as linear, I’ve looked at counterbalance with Steadicams etc. but I believe this just counteracts the weight on the end of the lever and doesn’t reduce the torque at the clamp

1662461535724.png


Obviously the mass added to the end of the lever will create a cw moment on the clamp and one way to counter the force would be to add another mass onto the other side of the clamp, however is it possible to achieve a counterbalance without adding another mass, while balancing out the moment forces

Would it be possible to convert the CW moment force to a linear spring tension by adding a mechanism at the clamp could this convert the torque seen at the clamp into spring tension?

1662461578420.png
Lever would be pivoted at centre of clamp and would then rest on mechanism at front

Any help much appreciated, Thanks
 
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  • #2
For moment not to be transferred to the clamp, it has to be converted to a pivot.
Your solution is good, as long as the force is able to keep direction by itself.
If a platform, some mechanism to keep it horizontal regardless the applied force will be neccesary.
 
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What is a moment force at lever support?

A moment force at lever support is a type of force that acts on a lever at a specific point, causing it to rotate around that point. It is also known as a torque or a turning force.

How is a moment force at lever support calculated?

The moment force at lever support is calculated by multiplying the force applied to the lever by the distance from the point of rotation to the point where the force is applied. This can be represented by the equation M = F x d, where M is the moment force, F is the applied force, and d is the distance from the point of rotation.

What are some real-life examples of moment forces at lever support?

Some common examples of moment forces at lever support include using a wrench to turn a bolt, opening a door, or using a see-saw at the playground. In each of these cases, the force applied to the lever causes it to rotate around a specific point.

How does the direction of the force affect the moment force at lever support?

The direction of the force applied to the lever can affect the moment force. If the force is applied perpendicular to the lever, it will have the maximum effect in terms of causing rotation. However, if the force is applied at an angle, it will have a smaller effect on the moment force.

What are some factors that can affect the moment force at lever support?

The length of the lever, the distance from the point of rotation to the applied force, and the magnitude and direction of the force are all factors that can affect the moment force at lever support. Additionally, the material and weight of the lever can also impact the moment force.

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