Convolution and Impulse Signals

  • Thread starter cshum00
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  • #1
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I am a little confused about convolutions.

I know that convolution is the multiplication and then integral of the two signals. The confusion starts at the commutative property. If i try to change the time-shift from signal to another for any 2 general functions or equations the commutative property doesn't work out.

for example:
let x(t) = sin(t)
and h(t) = t^2

If you try to convolve the signals above with the commutative property you get 2 different results.

However, the convolution's commutative property does work out if h(t) were to be a impulse function. So, does it mean that convolution is only an integral between an impulse signal and a generic signal and not two generic signals? (which is the part i am confused because i have seen examples of convolving 2 different signals)
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
marcusl
Science Advisor
Gold Member
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I'm not sure what you are referring to. This article shows how convolutions are symmetric
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convolution" [Broken]
Scroll down to "Definitions" for the commutative property.
 
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