Curved trails by motion of heavenly bodies in space

In summary, The conversation discusses the possibility of stars creating trails or wakes in space as they move. While the concept of gravitational waves being generated is accepted, the idea of localized trails or wakes is not possible due to the lack of viscosity in space. Any perturbations would always travel at the speed of light and a source constantly sending a signal would be needed for a static perturbation to occur.
  • #1
dpa
147
0
Hi all,

This is a kind of idiotic question.

The presence of heavenly bodies in cosmos creates curvature in cosmos according to GR and the space has a kind of fluid like nature. I was wondering if the motion of stars through space creates trails. It sure doesnot. My question is why not?
 
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  • #2
That is an excellent question :-) Actually it does, but the waves produced are very very very tiny. They are so tiny, measuring the waves generated like this is impossible, even in theory. There are some experiments going on trying to measure gravitational waves generated by black hole binary systems, which are shedding a large part of their kinetic energy to gravitational radiation. Even this is very challenging.
 
  • #3
ooh, i don't know :confused:

that's waves, which spread out, and the question was about localised trails, as from an aircraft or in a cloud chamber

so the question is whether there's anything that could "condense" :wink:
 
  • #4
Oh I see, well then no. Because perturbations like that travel always at the speed of light. You would need a source constantly sending a signal to get a static perturbation.

I was thinking like a wake left by a boat. It works for multiple bodies, but a single test particle in a vacuum does not leave a wake, because space is not viscous. You don't lose energy to the medium and therefore there are no waves.
 

Related to Curved trails by motion of heavenly bodies in space

1. What causes the curved trails of heavenly bodies in space?

The curved trails of heavenly bodies in space, such as planets, comets, and asteroids, are caused by the force of gravity. This force is created by the mass of the objects and pulls them towards each other, creating a curved path as they orbit around each other.

2. How do scientists track and study these curved trails?

Scientists use various methods to track and study the curved trails of heavenly bodies in space. This includes telescopes, spacecraft, and mathematical models. Telescopes allow us to observe the movements of these objects in space, while spacecraft can collect data and images from a closer distance. Mathematical models are also used to predict and understand the patterns of motion in space.

3. Can the curved trails of heavenly bodies change over time?

Yes, the curved trails of heavenly bodies can change over time. This can be due to various factors such as the influence of other objects, changes in the gravitational pull, or collisions with other objects. Scientists continuously monitor and study these changes to gain a better understanding of the movements of objects in space.

4. Do all heavenly bodies in space follow the same type of curved trail?

No, not all heavenly bodies in space follow the same type of curved trail. The shape and pattern of the curved trail depend on the mass, size, and velocity of the object, as well as the gravitational pull of other objects. For example, planets have elliptical orbits, while comets have more elongated and inclined orbits.

5. How does the study of curved trails in space help us understand the universe?

The study of curved trails in space is crucial in helping us understand the universe. It allows us to track the movements of objects and predict future events such as eclipses and meteor showers. It also helps us understand the laws of gravity and how it shapes the structure and evolution of the universe. Additionally, studying curved trails can provide insights into the formation of our solar system and other planetary systems.

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