Darkfield,brightfield application in one microscope?

In summary, the conversation discusses viewing live specimens under a microscope and the challenges of keeping them in focus. It also mentions the use of darkfield and brightfield applications, which require expensive microscopes. A suggestion is given to use a student scope with a bright light source for a similar effect.
  • #1
Grace Anne
2
0
Hi every body! does anyone seen live specimen under the microscope?
How does live specimen moves and interacts? What kind of scope do i need to have darkfield and brightfield application? Is there any scope that can be used in two applications?:confused:
Would anyone help me choose what kind of scope will I use? I don't know what microscope can fit my application.


Thank you.
 
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  • #2
Live specimens are often viewed in a hanging drop slide. Placing a coverslip over motile beasties can lock them down. And it is way more fun to watch amoebas blob around in a drop of water. Sometimes it can be a challenge to keep them in your field of view and in focus. Especially if you lose them once... and have to track them down again.

Darkfield and phase contrast features usually come only with very expensive microscopes, because they require a special condenser or a special setup. I see darkfield scopes for blood work listed at way over $US3000.

You can achieve something like what you want by getting a student scope, and mounting a very bright directed light source to shine into your specimen at a right angle. Rather than from the bottom upwards.

In other words, I can't give you a recommendation like you want.
 
  • #3
Thanks for the reply, now I know that this application really requires expensive scope.
 
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Related to Darkfield,brightfield application in one microscope?

1. What is the difference between darkfield and brightfield microscopy?

Darkfield microscopy uses scattered light to provide contrast, making transparent or unstained specimens more visible. Brightfield microscopy uses transmitted light to provide contrast, making stained specimens more visible.

2. Can darkfield and brightfield be used in the same microscope?

Yes, some microscopes have the capability to switch between darkfield and brightfield illumination. This allows for greater versatility in studying different types of specimens.

3. What are the advantages of using darkfield and brightfield together?

Using darkfield and brightfield together can provide a more comprehensive and detailed view of a specimen. Darkfield can highlight structures that may not be visible in brightfield, while brightfield can provide a clearer view of stained structures.

4. How do I adjust the lighting for darkfield and brightfield microscopy?

For darkfield, the condenser should be moved so that it is off-center, allowing for light to be reflected at an angle onto the specimen. For brightfield, the condenser should be centered and the iris diaphragm adjusted to control the amount of light passing through the specimen.

5. Are there any limitations to using darkfield and brightfield in the same microscope?

One limitation is that using darkfield may require additional equipment, such as a light stop or darkfield condenser, which can be costly. Additionally, darkfield may not be suitable for certain specimens, as it can produce a halo effect around structures.

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