Decode the given message manually or using a table only

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In summary, the conversation discusses a homework problem where a transmission from a transmission media needs to be decoded using ASCII-coding. The transmission is in several parts, with the start of frame being 1010101010101011 and the message always being 70 bits long. The participants discuss using hexadecimal numbers to decode the message and the importance of using two digits at a time. They also mention using outside resources to find the solution and the limitations of using only one hexadecimal numeral to represent an ASCII character.
  • #1
Wolverine31
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Homework Statement


We have captured some transmission from some transmission media and it is not a clear readable text. We know that the message part of the frame is using ASCII-coding to code the message. The transmission is in several parts. We know that the start of frame is 1010101010101011 and we know that the message is always 70 bits long. What is the message in clear clear text if the message is the following.

AAAB5452414E534D49535349AAAB494F4E20464C5549442052AAAB4544204C494E45393030

Homework Equations


The Attempt at a Solution



This homework was given to us by our professor after giving brief introduction about ASCII codes (nothing in detail) as a part of digital circuits course. I tried using the tables and some tools online to convert it to readable text but failed. Can you please give me a hint ?
 
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  • #2
the binary 1010-1010-1011 is 10-10-11 in decimal

The hex starts A-A-B which is, you guessed it, 10-10-11 in decimal

I'd assume AAAB is the header, and the message starts with the 54...

Not sure how far I should go with a homework question
 
  • #3
d3mm said:
the binary 1010-1010-1011 is 10-10-11 in decimal

The hex starts A-A-B which is, you guessed it, 10-10-11 in decimal

I'd assume AAAB is the header, and the message starts with the 54...

Not sure how far I should go with a homework question


Thanks for the hint. It got me started. But I got stuck again. I am not sure if I should use the ASCII value of 5(hex) at a time or 54(hex) at a time. And I am sorry because homework was totally out of what was taught in class and the professor wanted us to find the solutions using online resources.
 
  • #4
By outside resources he means that you should find and read articles on the subject, not that you should crowd source the answer. It's a mathy class not a social engineering class.
 
  • #5
d3mm said:
By outside resources he means that you should find and read articles on the subject, not that you should crowd source the answer. It's a mathy class not a social engineering class.

Ok i got your point. But I did that beforehand it worked for all other problems I had but not this one and also i compared the message part with ASCII characters in the table but i still cannot get a readable text. And there are 70 bits in the message part and each bit when decoded using the table give out something stupid and very long.
 
  • #6
Wolverine31 said:
Thanks for the hint. It got me started. But I got stuck again. I am not sure if I should use the ASCII value of 5(hex) at a time or 54(hex) at a time. And I am sorry because homework was totally out of what was taught in class and the professor wanted us to find the solutions using online resources.

What does 54 in hex represent in ASCII? What does hex 52 represent in ASCII? Keep going...
 
  • #7
berkeman said:
What does 54 in hex represent in ASCII? What does hex 52 represent in ASCII? Keep going...


Thank you. I tried doing with a single bit value ie fot 5,2 and so on. So i did not get readable message. Thank you once again. But i still don't understand why the we use twot bits at a time but not 1 or 2. thanks once again
 
  • #8
Wolverine31 said:
Thank you. I tried doing with a single bit value ie fot 5,2 and so on. So i did not get readable message. Thank you once again. But i still don't understand why the we use twot bits at a time but not 1 or 2. thanks once again
Each hexadecimal number in the message is 4 bits. Ascii characters are represented by 8 bits (one byte).

Think of it another way. The hexidecimal numbers in the message range from 0 to F (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, A, B, C, D, E, F). That's a total of 16 values for each hex digit. (24 = 16). If only one hexadecimal numeral mapped to an Ascii character, there would be only 16 Ascii characters, maximum. One couldn't even represent the alphabet that way, not to mention numbers and special characters.

With two hexidecimal numerals per Ascii character, there's 8 bits (one byte). That allows for a total of 28 = 256 possible representations. (And, if you haven't guessed, the Ascii table plus the extended Ascii codes total to 256 different characters.)
 
  • #9
collinsmark said:
Each hexadecimal number in the message is 4 bits. Ascii characters are represented by 8 bits (one byte).

Think of it another way. The hexidecimal numbers in the message range from 0 to F (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, A, B, C, D, E, F). That's a total of 16 values for each hex digit. (24 = 16). If only one hexadecimal numeral mapped to an Ascii character, there would be only 16 Ascii characters, maximum. One couldn't even represent the alphabet that way, not to mention numbers and special characters.

With two hexidecimal numerals, there's 8 bits (one byte). That allows for a total of 28 = 256 possible representations. (And, if you haven't guessed, the Ascii table plus the extended Ascii codes total to 256 different characters.)


Thanks a bunch for a crystal clear explanation. :smile:
 

Related to Decode the given message manually or using a table only

What does "Decode the given message manually or using a table only" mean?

"Decode the given message manually or using a table only" means that the message needs to be translated or deciphered using either manual methods or a pre-made table, without the use of any other aids or tools.

Why would someone need to decode a message manually or using a table only?

Decoding a message manually or using a table only may be necessary in situations where access to technology or other resources is limited or prohibited. It may also be used as a challenge or puzzle for problem-solving or code-breaking purposes.

What are some examples of manual methods for decoding a message?

Examples of manual methods for decoding a message include using a codebook or key, applying mathematical operations, using letter frequency analysis, or using substitution ciphers.

What is a decoding table and how is it used?

A decoding table is a pre-made table that lists coded symbols or letters and their corresponding decoded values. It is used by matching the coded symbol with its corresponding value to decode a message.

What are some tips for successfully decoding a message manually or using a table only?

Some tips for successfully decoding a message manually or using a table only include looking for patterns, using context clues, and making educated guesses. It is also helpful to have knowledge of common ciphers and techniques used in code-making and code-breaking.

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