Definite Integral: Limit of a Summation

  • Thread starter Immersion
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  • #1
Immersion
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Homework Statement



Hi guys, i have a exercise of the limit of a summation that is the formal definition of definite integral and i need resolve and explain, but i can't resolve for the rational exponent, for this, need help, thanks in advance.

Homework Equations



[itex]\lim_{n \rightarrow \infty} \sum_{i=1}^{n} {(1+\frac{2}{n}(i-0.3))^{\frac{7}{5}}\frac{2}{n}[/itex]

The Attempt at a Solution



I can solve this expretion but with a integer exponent, not with a rational exponent.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Immersion
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Help me, please.
 
  • #3
Dick
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That really doesn't look like a Riemann sum to me. Were you given that sum?
 

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