Deriving formula to calculate theta for artillery

In summary, the conversation discusses the formula for calculating the angle needed to hit a target in an online shooter game with artillery. The formula is derived as (DEGREES(ASIN((9.81*A1)/(400^2))))/2 or (sin-1((9.81R)/(4002))/2=\Theta. The speaker questions the accuracy of the projectile velocity and suggests using the formula for range(angle) to calculate a theoretical range and then adjusting the projectile velocity based on the ratio between the calculated and measured range.
  • #1
super6logan
3
0
I play an online shooter game with artillery that players can use. As best I can tell, the shell exits the artillery at 400m/s, I don't know if that's correct because units aren't listed in the code but it sounds logical. I know the distance to target as well, I only need to know what angle to aim the barrel to hit to target. Here's the formula I've derived as it looks in excel with A1 being the cell with the target range:
=(DEGREES(ASIN((9.81*A1)/(400^2))))/2
and in an equation, r as range to target:
(sin-1((9.81R)/(4002))/2=[tex]\Theta[/tex]

The problem is that if I plug a range like 650m into it the output in excel is 1.14201, an impossible number but I know that the artillery can hit ranges over 700m. Does this imply that the 400m/s V0 I have is wrong?
 
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  • #2
The formula is correct, but the projectile velocity is probably much lower (maybe 400 km/h?). I assume the game does not consider air resistance (you can check this by observing the symmetry of the trajectory). You should use your formula for range(angle) to calculate theoretical range (with your guess for projectile velocity). Then you measure the actual range at that angle in the game. Since the range is proportional to the square of the
projectile velocity, you simply divide your guess for projectile velocity by the square root of
the ratio between calculated range and measured range. For example: if your calculated range is 9 times too large, you divide projectile velocity by 3.
 
  • #3


First of all, great job on deriving a formula to calculate theta for artillery! It's always impressive to see players using their knowledge and skills in real-life scenarios, even if it's just in a game.

Now, to address the issue you're facing with the output of your formula. It is possible that the 400m/s velocity you have for the artillery's shell is incorrect. As you mentioned, it is not listed in the code and may not be accurate. Additionally, there could be other factors at play such as air resistance, wind speed, and elevation that could affect the velocity of the shell.

One way to confirm the velocity is to test it in different scenarios and distances and see if the results align with the expected outcomes. Another option is to consult with the game developers or other experienced players to see if they have any information on the velocity of the artillery's shell.

In any case, it is always a good idea to double-check your assumptions and formulas to ensure their accuracy. Keep up the good work and happy gaming!
 

Related to Deriving formula to calculate theta for artillery

1. What is theta in the context of artillery?

Theta is the angle of elevation or depression from the horizontal that is required to launch a projectile from a specific location to a specific target. It is an important factor in determining the trajectory and range of artillery shells.

2. How do you calculate theta for artillery?

The formula for calculating theta for artillery is:
theta = arctan(distance to target / height difference between launching point and target). This formula takes into account the horizontal distance to the target as well as the difference in elevation between the launching point and the target.

3. What is the purpose of calculating theta for artillery?

The purpose of calculating theta for artillery is to determine the angle at which the projectile should be launched in order to reach a specific target. This is crucial in achieving accuracy and precision in artillery attacks.

4. How is the theta formula derived?

The theta formula for artillery is derived using trigonometry and the laws of physics. It takes into account the horizontal and vertical components of the projectile's motion and uses the principles of projectile motion to determine the optimal angle for launch.

5. Are there any factors that can affect the accuracy of the theta formula?

Yes, there are several factors that can affect the accuracy of the theta formula for artillery. These include wind speed and direction, air resistance, and the rotation of the Earth. Additionally, the formula assumes a flat, uniform terrain and does not account for any obstacles or variations in elevation on the path to the target.

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