Describe the electron's subsequent circular motion

In summary, the electron's subsequent circular motion refers to the path that an electron follows when it orbits around the nucleus of an atom. It moves in a circular motion due to the electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged electron and the positively charged nucleus, and is kept in its path by the centripetal force. The circular motion can change if the electron gains or loses energy, and it is not perfectly circular due to the uncertainty principle in quantum mechanics.
  • #1
jan2905
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An electron (mass=m, charge=-e) is projected with speed v upward, in the plane of the page, into a region containing a uniform magnetic field B, that is directed into the plane of the page. Describe the electron's subsequent circular motion.

I tried using the Right-Hand Rule.

I said: Clockwise rotation; radius of path = mv/(eB). Is this correct?
 
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  • #2
Yes.
 
  • #3


Yes, your response is correct. According to the Right-Hand Rule, when an electron with negative charge is projected into a uniform magnetic field directed into the plane of the page, it will experience a force perpendicular to both its velocity and the magnetic field. This force will cause the electron to move in a circular path with a clockwise rotation. The radius of this circular path can be calculated using the equation mv/(eB), where m is the mass of the electron, v is its velocity, e is the charge of the electron, and B is the strength of the magnetic field. This equation is known as the cyclotron radius and is used to describe the circular motion of charged particles in a magnetic field.
 

Related to Describe the electron's subsequent circular motion

1. What is electron's subsequent circular motion?

The electron's subsequent circular motion refers to the path that an electron follows when it orbits around the nucleus of an atom.

2. How does an electron move in a circular motion?

An electron moves in a circular motion due to the electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged electron and the positively charged nucleus of an atom. This force causes the electron to continuously orbit around the nucleus.

3. What keeps an electron in its circular path?

The centripetal force, also known as the electrostatic force, keeps the electron in its circular path. This force acts as a "string" that pulls the electron towards the center of the circular orbit.

4. Can an electron's circular motion change?

Yes, an electron's circular motion can change if it gains or loses energy. This can happen when the electron is excited to a higher energy level or when it emits energy and falls back to a lower energy level. In these cases, the electron's circular orbit will change in size and/or shape.

5. Is the electron's circular motion perfectly circular?

No, the electron's circular motion is not perfectly circular. Due to the uncertainty principle in quantum mechanics, the exact position and velocity of an electron cannot be simultaneously known. This means that an electron's orbit is more like a blurry cloud around the nucleus rather than a precise circular path.

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