Design Wooden Gate & Hinges for Durability & Wind Resistance

In summary: I disagree. I would go at least 3 ft down (rent an auger and locate your utilities) put some spikes through the buried part of the base, use a big diameter hole and fill it with stone and/or cement. If you get this part wrong you will not be a happy person.I would think that setting the uprights 2' or more in concrete would support a gate 59" wide, provided that the soil around the concrete isn't real soft.
  • #1
diyhome
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TL;DR Summary
Repairing a wooden gate and I would like some advice.
I'm in the process of repairing a wooden gate and would like to replace the wooden posts with metal ones, to help avoid the amount of sag over time. Both the gates are 59 wide by 50 height weighing about 25-50 pounds each(I don't have a scale to weigh it) made from pressure treated wood.
I want to use these parts to hang the gates to the metal post. My concern is the following:
1. How much torque to apply to the bolts on the post hinges to make sure it doesn't fall down the post.
2. Is 150 lbs Safe working load enough to support the gate. I will be putting 2 on each gate.
3. I live in an area where we've had winds gusts up to 75mph. Will this be sufficient to support the fence?

I can provide links if that is needed. Thanks in advance.

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  • #2
What do you mean by this: "2. Is 150 lbs Safe working load enough to support the gate. I will be putting 2 on each gate."?
 
  • #3
Sorry, added another picture of the setup. Hope this helps.
 
  • #5
The fence post hinges are designed to hold big chain link fence gates. Find out how much they weigh (my guess is they are at least as heavy as your gate).
You can torque those things pretty tight on the pole...if it starts to move tighten it up. The movement I have encountered is that they rotate on the pole. Tighten it up.
The usual failure point is of course not getting the post securely in the ground. Put it in deep and if possible pack good sized stones and maybe cement. I like to drill a few rods through the buried part of the pole to inhibit rotation. They also make surface caps to inhibit rocking at ground level. The rest will be easy.
 
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  • #6
thanks for the suggestions. I will contact the manufacture and see if they can offer assistance on the hinge specs.
The posts will be in a minimum of 2 feet with cement for support.
 
  • #7
diyhome said:
I want to use these parts to hang the gates to the metal post. My concern is the following:
The hinges should be OK. Not by engineering, but simply by looking :wink:
Your concern should be about stabilizing the pole. Two feet 'base' might not be enough without additional 'fixing', like connecting the top point of the pole to the fence.
Also, check this topic.
 
  • #8
AZFIREBALL said:
What do you mean by this: "2. Is 150 lbs Safe working load enough to support the gate. I will be putting 2 on each gate."?
From the picture (added after the initial post), the gates look to be well under 150 lb. apiece.
hutchphd said:
You can torque those things pretty tight on the pole...if it starts to move tighten it up.
That's how I would do it.
Rive said:
Two feet 'base' might not be enough without additional 'fixing', like connecting the top point of the pole to the fence.
I'd think that setting the uprights 2' or more in concrete would support a gate 59" wide, provided that the soil around the concrete isn't real soft.
 
  • #9
Mark44 said:
I'd think that setting the uprights 2' or more in concrete would support a gate 59" wide, provided that the soil around the concrete isn't real soft.
I disagree. I would go at least 3 ft down (rent an auger and locate your utilities) put some spikes through the buried part of the base, use a big diameter hole and fill it with stone and/or cement. If you get this part wrong you will not be a happy person. I prefer packed stone to concrete but that is up to you. There is no easy fix if you go too shallow.
 
  • #10
Mark44 said:
I'd think that setting the uprights 2' or more in concrete would support a gate 59" wide, provided that the soil around the concrete isn't real soft.
On long term, it'll be a mix of dynamic and static load.
2' may be enough if it's part of the fence (top of the pole is locked to the fence). But why risk it?
Once you have to tear apart a gate to replace the pole there is no chance you can put it back together the same way.
 
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  • #11
hutchphd said:
I would go at least 3 ft down
That's what the PDF I linked says.
Mark44 said:
the gates look to be well under 150 lb. apiece.
I think it if not just the weight. A wide but not high gate would put more force on the hinges, although that does not seem to be the case here.
 

Related to Design Wooden Gate & Hinges for Durability & Wind Resistance

1. What type of wood is best for a durable gate?

The best type of wood for a durable gate is a hardwood such as cedar, redwood, or oak. These types of wood are naturally resistant to rot and decay, making them ideal for outdoor use.

2. How should the wooden gate be constructed for maximum durability?

To ensure maximum durability, the wooden gate should be constructed with strong joints and reinforced corners. The use of high-quality screws or bolts is also recommended over nails, as they provide a stronger and longer-lasting hold.

3. How can the hinges be designed for durability?

The hinges should be designed with heavy-duty materials such as stainless steel or galvanized steel. They should also be properly sized and installed to support the weight of the gate and withstand strong winds.

4. What features should the hinges have for wind resistance?

The hinges should have a strong and secure attachment to the gate and the post. They should also have a smooth and sturdy rotation to prevent the gate from swinging too much in windy conditions.

5. Can a wooden gate be made completely windproof?

While a wooden gate can be designed and constructed for maximum wind resistance, it cannot be made completely windproof. It is important to regularly inspect and maintain the gate to ensure its durability and wind resistance over time.

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