Designing Airfoils: Choard Sizing & Printing - Low Reynolds #50000

In summary, the software X-Foil is available for free, but it may require some compilation to run. There are other options available for airfoil design, but they may be more expensive.
  • #1
_mariyan_
14
0
Hi
I need a software for designing airfoil that alows changing the choard size and printing. If you know any please tell me.
Btw do you know any refrence for low Reynolds number (about 50000)?
I want to choose NACA7610 for my glider but I don't know exactly how it behaves at low Reynolds number. PLEASE HELP
 
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  • #2
Most drawing progams will allow you to draw an airfoil and change the chord size and then print the result. I'm not sure what you're asking here.

I'm also not sure that 50000 is a low Reynold's number, that seems to be very definitely in the turbulent region.
Laminar 0>Re>3000
Transition 3000>Re>4000
Turbulent Re>4000

If you need CFD software, there is an opensource software called openfoam, but it only runs on Linux. Check wikipedia for other CFD software links.
 
  • #3
redargon said:
Most drawing progams will allow you to draw an airfoil and change the chord size and then print the result. I'm not sure what you're asking here.

I'm also not sure that 50000 is a low Reynold's number, that seems to be very definitely in the turbulent region.
Laminar 0>Re>3000
Transition 3000>Re>4000
Turbulent Re>4000

If you need CFD software, there is an opensource software called openfoam, but it only runs on Linux. Check wikipedia for other CFD software links.

These Re numbers are generally true for pipe flow. Do you have any sources saying they are also true for airfoil sections? I would like to see this if you have it.
 
  • #4
nope, no sources. What you say is true, thanks for pointing that out, do you have anything useful for the OP?
 
  • #5
you may use designfoil software which is freely available by searching google
 
  • #6
redargon said:
nope, no sources. What you say is true, thanks for pointing that out, do you have anything useful for the OP?

He could try xfoil.
 
  • #7
Cyrus said:
He could try xfoil.

I downloaded xfoil but I can't open it:frown:
 
  • #8
A professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign lists several resources on his page:

http://www.ae.uiuc.edu/m-selig/ads.html

His list includes XFOIL, as already mentioned by Cyrus.
 
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  • #9
Did you download the correct version of X-Foil?

here is the one i am using

http://web.mit.edu/drela/Public/web/xfoil/xfoil6.96.zip

Runs windows, xp/vista and is easy to use/run

You may have downloaded the source that needs compiling?
 
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  • #10
Cyrus said:
These Re numbers are generally true for pipe flow. Do you have any sources saying they are also true for airfoil sections? I would like to see this if you have it.
helo cyrus,check this link
01.http://www.zenithair.com/kit-data/ht-87-5.html
 
  • #11
There is nothing in those articles that ties the typical piping Reynolds numbers to airfoil usage.
 
  • #13
XFLR5 and profili is also good software where we could analyse more different aerofoils
 
  • #14
I've said this before, but it is fairly easy to write a vortex panel program in Matlab to calculate lift coefficients. Anderson's aerodynamics book covers this stuff in detail.
 
  • #15
Brian_C said:
I've said this before, but it is fairly easy to write a vortex panel program in Matlab to calculate lift coefficients. Anderson's aerodynamics book covers this stuff in detail.

IF you can afford the $1900 price tag.
 

Related to Designing Airfoils: Choard Sizing & Printing - Low Reynolds #50000

1. What is the purpose of designing airfoils for low Reynolds numbers?

The purpose of designing airfoils for low Reynolds numbers is to optimize the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft or other flying object. Low Reynolds numbers typically refer to flight conditions where the air is less dense and moves slower, such as for small drones or model airplanes. By designing airfoils specifically for these conditions, it can improve the overall efficiency and stability of the flight.

2. What is chord sizing in airfoil design?

Chord sizing in airfoil design refers to the process of determining the length of the airfoil's chord, which is the distance from the leading edge to the trailing edge. This is an important factor in airfoil design as it affects the lift and drag forces that act on the airfoil during flight. A longer chord can provide more lift, while a shorter chord can reduce drag.

3. How is chord sizing determined for low Reynolds number airfoils?

Chord sizing for low Reynolds number airfoils is determined through a combination of theoretical calculations and wind tunnel testing. Theoretical calculations, such as the thin airfoil theory, can provide a starting point for chord sizing, but wind tunnel testing is necessary to validate and refine the design. The goal is to find the optimal chord length that balances lift and drag for the specific flight conditions and objectives.

4. What is the role of printing in airfoil design?

Printing plays a crucial role in airfoil design, as it allows for precise and accurate production of the airfoil shape. With advancements in 3D printing technology, it is now possible to create complex and customized airfoil designs that were not possible before. Printing also allows for rapid prototyping and testing of different airfoil designs, making the design process more efficient and cost-effective.

5. What are some challenges in designing airfoils for low Reynolds numbers?

Designing airfoils for low Reynolds numbers can present several challenges, such as limited lift and high drag. These conditions require careful consideration of the airfoil shape, including the curvature and thickness distribution, to generate enough lift while minimizing drag. Additionally, low Reynolds numbers can also lead to flow separation and stall, which can greatly affect the performance of the airfoil. Therefore, extensive testing and optimization are necessary to overcome these challenges in airfoil design.

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