Do phosphorus allotropes produce the same liquid?

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In summary, phosphorus can exist in different allotropes, each with their own distinct melting point. However, the liquid form of phosphorus is the same regardless of the allotrope it originated from. This is because when melted, all solid allotropes of phosphorus revert back to the same molecular formula. Therefore, the liquid form of phosphorus can exist at different temperatures depending on the allotrope, such as 45 °C for white phosphorus and 590-610 °C for red phosphorus. This is due to the triple point of red phosphorus being at 590 °C, meaning it can exist as a liquid at this temperature. However, it is possible for elements to have
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DallMall
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Hello,

Phosphorus may be present as different allotropes like white, red, violet or black phosphorus. All of them have a more or less different melting point. For example white phosphorus has a melting point of around 45 °C (source), while a red phosphorus has a melting point of around 590 or 610 °C (source, source).

Now my question is whether the liquid phosphorus obtained after melting any of these allotropes is actually the same liquid with same arrangement of phosphorus atoms into molecules?? If that is so than how is it possible for red phosphorus to have a melting point of around 600 °C while white phosphorus has a boiling point of about 280 °C (source)? If it was the same liquid then red (and black) phosphorus should not have a liquid form at all and simply sublimate.

Yet wikipedia disagrees and I quote: ''For some elements, allotropes have different molecular formulae which can persist in different phases – for example, two allotropes of oxygen (dioxygen, O2, and ozone, O3), can both exist in the solid, liquid and gaseous states. Conversely, some elements do not maintain distinct allotropes in different phases – for example phosphorus has numerous solid allotropes, which all revert to the same P4 form when melted to the liquid state.''

What do you think?
 
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Related to Do phosphorus allotropes produce the same liquid?

1. Do different phosphorus allotropes produce the same liquid?

No, different allotropes of phosphorus produce different liquids. For example, white phosphorus produces a yellow liquid while red phosphorus produces a colorless liquid.

2. What factors affect the liquid produced by phosphorus allotropes?

The factors that affect the liquid produced by phosphorus allotropes include temperature, pressure, and the specific allotrope present. These factors can lead to variations in the color, density, and other properties of the liquid produced.

3. Can the liquid produced by phosphorus allotropes be used for industrial purposes?

Yes, the liquid produced by certain phosphorus allotropes, such as white phosphorus, can be used for industrial purposes such as producing fertilizers, pesticides, and detergents.

4. Are there any safety concerns when working with the liquid produced by phosphorus allotropes?

Yes, the liquid produced by some phosphorus allotropes, particularly white phosphorus, is highly reactive and can be toxic. Special precautions should be taken when handling this liquid to avoid any potential hazards.

5. Can the liquid produced by phosphorus allotropes be converted back into solid phosphorus?

Yes, the liquid produced by phosphorus allotropes can be converted back into solid phosphorus through various processes such as cooling, evaporation, or chemical reactions. This can be useful in certain industrial processes where solid phosphorus is needed.

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