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B Do temperature and gravity affect particle or nuclear decay??

  1. Oct 12, 2017 #1
    I thought of another question(s) :) does temperature affect the rate of the decay at all?
    Does temperature effect the energy of the decay; in that the energy of the electron anti neutrino would be higher?
     
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  3. Oct 12, 2017 #2

    mfb

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    No.
    If the decaying atom moves fast, the energy distribution of the decay products will look different. It is not a simple shift, it is more complicated.
     
  4. Oct 13, 2017 #3

    Orodruin

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    Be careful with the ”at all”. Warmer atoms will decay slower due to time dilation. Of course, this effect is completely negligible at reasonable temperatures.
     
  5. Oct 13, 2017 #4
    So altitude from Earth effects the decay too; I remember once making the point regarding carbon dating that we assume the time is linear and comparable. Never thought from that perspective, the (geometric) effects on the decay for this tritium veil.
     
  6. Oct 13, 2017 #5

    Orodruin

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    Be careful (my favourite words). Locally, there will be no difference whatsoever because your time-dilation will be the same as that of the experiment you are doing.
     
  7. Oct 13, 2017 #6

    mfb

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    Gravitational time dilation is about 10-13 per kilometer height difference. Something 10 km deep for a billion years would appear a few hours younger than expected. Needless to say that no geologic timing method is remotely close to such a sensitivity.
     
  8. Oct 14, 2017 #7
    lol yes, that's assuming the time is linear and comparable.

    not sure what a particularly made up case of a small differential and something about sensitivity has to do with it, certainly doesn't mean that the "clocks" were always synchronized.
     
  9. Oct 14, 2017 #8

    mfb

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    It means gravitational time dilation is completely negligible for determining the age of things on Earth. The same applies to the time dilation from motion.
     
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