Do you know any professors working on Accelerator-Driven Nuclear Reactors?

Broken]There is a test accelerator being constructed at Daresbury Laboratory to test a new proton driver concept. There is also work being done at the University of Edinburgh.Please drop me a line at:Hi there, our group at Manchester University is working on ADSRs, and we have a test accelerator being constructed at Daresbury Laboratory to test a new proton driver concept. Please drop us a line at: http://www.hep.manchester.ac.uk/accelerators/adsr [Broken]There is a test accelerator being constructed at Daresbury Laboratory to test a new proton driver concept. There is also work being done at the University of Edinburgh.
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I have just finished my PhD in Statistics. My Masters Dissertation was on the topic of Accelerator Driven Nuclear Energy Systems. I would be very interested in continuing research on the subject as a post-doctoral student.
 
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  • #2
mvshubov said:
I have just finished my PhD in Statistics. My Masters Dissertation was on the topic of Accelerator Driven Nuclear Energy Systems. I would be very interested in continuing research on the subject as a post-doctoral student.

I don't know anybody personally (beyond casual), but you could look at CEN/SCK:
http://www.sckcen.be/en/Our-Research/Research-projects/EU-projects-FP6-FP7/EUROTRANS [Broken]
 
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There are programs in the US, Europe and Asia.

Accelerator-driven Nuclear Energy
http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/inf35.html

Fast Reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems Knowledge Base
http://www.iaea.org/inisnkm/nkm/aws/fnss/abstracts/abst_tecdoc1348_17.html

http://www.iaea.org/inisnkm/nkm/aws/fnss/abstracts/abst_tecdoc1348.html

IAEA-TECDOC--1356: Emerging nuclear energy and transmutation systems: Core physics and engineering aspects
http://www.iaea.org/inisnkm/nkm/aws/fnss/abstracts/abst_te_1356_web.html


I believe UIUC, U of Wisconsin, UCal-Berkeley, MIT, Texas A&M, U of Florida-Gainesville, and others have ADS in their Nuclear Eng programs.
 
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Thank you very much. Could anyone please give me some information on professors in Eastern USA working in that area.
 
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How far east. Are Illinois or Wisconsin considered to far west?

Meanwhile - check some of these theses - http://www.studentpipeline.org/afci/ms/theses.html [Broken] - which include some ADS topics and which give one an idea where research is being done.

I'll see if I can identify specific programs later.
 
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  • #6
Astronuc said:
How far east. Are Illinois or Wisconsin considered to far west?

Meanwhile - check some of these theses - http://www.studentpipeline.org/afci/ms/theses.html [Broken] - which include some ADS topics and which give one an idea where research is being done.

I'll see if I can identify specific programs later.

Hi there, our group at Manchester University is working on ADSRs, and we have a test accelerator being constructed at Daresbury Laboratory to test a new proton driver concept. Please drop us a line at: http://www.hep.manchester.ac.uk/accelerators/
 
Last edited by a moderator:

1. What are Accelerator-Driven Nuclear Reactors (ADNRs)?

ADNRs are a type of nuclear reactor that uses an external particle accelerator to provide the necessary neutrons for the nuclear chain reaction. Unlike traditional nuclear reactors, ADNRs do not rely on a self-sustaining nuclear reaction and are therefore inherently safer.

2. What are the advantages of using ADNRs?

ADNRs have several advantages over traditional nuclear reactors. They produce less nuclear waste, are safer to operate, and can use a wider range of nuclear fuels. Additionally, ADNRs can be used to transmute long-lived radioactive waste into shorter-lived isotopes, reducing the overall radioactivity and environmental impact.

3. Are there any risks associated with ADNRs?

As with any nuclear technology, there are some risks associated with ADNRs. However, these risks are generally lower compared to traditional nuclear reactors. The main risk is the potential for a radiation leak, but the use of external particle accelerators reduces the likelihood of this happening.

4. What is the current state of research on ADNRs?

Research on ADNRs has been ongoing for several decades, with various prototypes and experiments being conducted around the world. However, there are currently no commercial ADNRs in operation. The technology is still in its early stages, but advancements are continuously being made.

5. Do you know any professors working on ADNRs?

Yes, there are several professors and researchers around the world who specialize in ADNRs and are actively conducting research in this field. It would be best to search for specific universities or research institutions that have a focus on nuclear energy and see which professors are conducting research on ADNRs.

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