Does anyone know of a thermally-stable endothermic reaction?

  • #1
Hello all,
I've used physicsforums a few times over the years, but I believe this is my first post. I'm working on an engineering project in which I need to find a highly-endothermic reaction where the reactants and products will be stable at very high temperatures (well over 800C), or at least not release toxic by-products. These chemicals may eventually be placed in a fire to gather some data. Does anyone know of any such reactions? Or at least where I can look to find possible candidates? Possible types of reactions could include liquids dissolving, or mixtures between different compounds. I don't have much of a chemistry background so I'd appreciate any help!
Thank you all in advance!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Nidum
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Could you please explain more clearly what you are actually trying to do ?
 
  • #3
Hello Nidum, unfortunately I don't think I can go into too much detail for intellectual property reasons, but essentially I am trying to build a device that can be submerged in a fire and uses the fire to drive an endothermic reaction.
I have looked into a refrigerant, for example R134a - if this is heated to the vaporization temperature, would it cause a cooling effect inside the device?
 
  • #4
Bystander
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  • #5
Sorry, you will NOT find any organic compounds that are stable at that temperature.
Hello Bystander, what do you mean by stable? Perhaps I'm using incorrect terminology - what I meant was something that, even if it reacted, wouldn't produce harmful by-products.
 
  • #8
256bits
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Hello Nidum, unfortunately I don't think I can go into too much detail for intellectual property reasons, but essentially I am trying to build a device that can be submerged in a fire and uses the fire to drive an endothermic reaction.
I have looked into a refrigerant, for example R134a - if this is heated to the vaporization temperature, would it cause a cooling effect inside the device?
Put an ice cube in the device. The melting absorbs energy from the fire.
 
  • #9
berkeman
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Thread closed temporarily for Moderation...
 
  • #10
jim mcnamara
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All things considered, we see posts just like yours that are supposedly doing something unique. PF is here to help with established, clear scientific problems they need some guidance with.

Two points:
If this is such a special secret, have you done a patent search? Your knowledge of Chemistry seems limited. It looks like you are trying to create some kind of fire extinguisher. In any event, given the above statements, PF does not support these kinds of endeavors, and most especially by folks with limited experience.
We think live, fully functioning participants on the forum are the best choice. Thread closed.
 
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