Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

I Does continuous acceleration eventually create a black hole

  1. Nov 23, 2015 #1
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 23, 2015 #2

    Orodruin

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    In general relativity, mass is not the source of gravity, the energy-momentum-tensor is and it also contains information about mass.

    You should also read this:
    What is relativistic mass and why it is not used much?
    Physicists do not talk much about rest mass simply because it is an archaic concept which only tends to confuse the general public.
     
  4. Nov 23, 2015 #3
    Consider the following equation:
    upload_2015-11-23_6-25-30.png
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_in_special_relativity#Controversy

    velocity (v) * the sum of m0 + mass associated with velocity.

    By this logic, momentum (p) is also a function of gravitational constant. If a GPS satellite returns from orbit to launch site, the relativistic mass within the satellite will correspond to the gravity and velocity of the launch site.
    https://www.uam.es/personal_pdi/ciencias/jcuevas/Teaching/GPS_relativity.pdf
     
  5. Nov 23, 2015 #4

    Nugatory

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    That expression for momentum is correct, but it has nothing to do with the gravitational constant (neither G nor anything derived from it appears).

    There's another way of thinking about the question in your original post: right now, even as we speak, you are moving at 99.9999% of the speed of light relative to something somewhere. Are you showing any signs of turning into a black hole?
     
  6. Nov 23, 2015 #5
    The momentum equation does not include the influence of relativistic mass from gravity, but should.

    If a GPS satellite returns from orbit to launch site, the relativistic energy within the satellite will correspond to the gravity and velocity (v) of the launch/return site.
    https://www.uam.es/personal_pdi/ciencias/jcuevas/Teaching/GPS_relativity.pdf
     
  7. Nov 23, 2015 #6

    Orodruin

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    No it should not. It is a special relativistic equation and there is no gravity in SR. In addition, when you go to GR it becomes a local statement which is still true. Furthermore, relativistic mass is an obsolete concept and you are trying to apply Newtonian gravity to SR rather than going into the actual GR description. This is doomed to fail and to create misunderstandings.
     
  8. Nov 23, 2015 #7

    PeterDonis

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    The answer to the OP question, as has been said several times, is "no". Enough said. Thread closed.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Does continuous acceleration eventually create a black hole
Loading...