Does grad school like to see teaching experience on apps?

In summary, teaching experience may benefit you in the long run and is a great way to achieve mastery in a subject. However, it may not hold as much weight as research experience when it comes to graduate school applications, which are primarily focused on training for research. It is still seen as a positive and can help to round out your application, but it should not be the main focus.
  • #1
1230wc
28
0
Hi all. I'm considering being a tutor for my dept and later on taking up a TA position.
I do enjoy teaching, but it's a time commitment.
Would such teaching experiences help me in applying to grad schools?


Thanks!
 
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  • #2
I don't know from experience, but I would imagine that this would benefit you in the long run. Teaching is one of the greatest ways to achieve mastery in a subject. I don't see why a gradute school would not look at this as a positive.
 
  • #3
i think it is good job for u. teaching is a way to learn more in your field.
 
  • #4
1230wc said:
Hi all. I'm considering being a tutor for my dept and later on taking up a TA position.
I do enjoy teaching, but it's a time commitment.
Would such teaching experiences help me in applying to grad schools?

It depends. To first approximation, it can only hurt you- graduate programs are generally designed to train you for a career in research. It's a sad fact that graduate education in science minimizes training in education, but there it is. Most programs, if given two otherwise identical applications, one from a person who spend their extracurricular time teaching and the other from a person who spent their extracurricular time doing research, will go for the latter application.

However, if I see a candidate with a well-rounded application, has thought deeply about their career path, and knows that they enjoy teaching, I will take teaching activity as a positive.
 
  • #5
From my experience on a selections committee, teaching (labs, tutoring, teaching HS for a few years, etc.) was seen as a positive -- since most accepted graduate students start their first term or first year with guaranteed financial support in the form of a TA (teaching assistant-ship) rather than an RA (research assistant-ship -- for which they must talk to faculty and arrange AFTER being accepted to the program, and most students spend their first year taking core coursework and talking to faculty on the side about possible research projects).

However, while the effect of teaching experience on acceptance is existent, it is VERY, VERY slight. As Andy mentions above, a Ph.D. program is generally designed to train the candidate for research (not teaching) This is true even though the majority of "academic" jobs are at schools where undergraduate education is significant. Note that competition for any academic job is tough, and it's a greater likelihood that you'll land a non-academic research position, either at a company or at a national lab, etc.

Generally the place to put any teaching experience on the graduate schools application would be on your resume/CV (if the school's application calls for one) or as a very small part in your personal statement and your professors' supporting recommendations (though these latter two pieces of your application should mostly concentrate on your RESEARCH EXPERIENCE).
 

Related to Does grad school like to see teaching experience on apps?

1. What type of teaching experience do grad schools prefer on applications?

Grad schools typically prefer teaching experience that is relevant to the field of study. This can include experience as a teaching assistant, tutor, or instructor in a related subject. They also value experience working with diverse groups of students and strong communication skills.

2. Is teaching experience necessary for admission to grad school?

While teaching experience is not a requirement for admission to grad school, it can be beneficial. It demonstrates your ability to effectively convey information and work with others, which are important skills for graduate studies. It can also make your application stand out among other applicants.

3. How can I gain teaching experience if I have none?

If you have no previous teaching experience, you can still gain some before applying to grad school. You can volunteer as a tutor or mentor, or seek out opportunities to assist a professor with teaching or research. You can also take courses or workshops on teaching and learning to gain knowledge and skills in this area.

4. Can teaching experience from a non-academic setting be included on my application?

Yes, teaching experience from a non-academic setting can still be valuable on your grad school application. This could include experience as a coach, camp counselor, or community educator. Be sure to highlight the skills and qualities you developed through these experiences and how they relate to teaching.

5. How should I present my teaching experience on my application?

When presenting your teaching experience on your application, be sure to provide specific details and examples of your responsibilities and accomplishments. Also, highlight any positive feedback or evaluations you received from students or supervisors. This will help to demonstrate the impact and effectiveness of your teaching experience.

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