Does Gravity Invalidate the Second Law of Thermodynamics?

In summary, The conversation discusses the concept of disorder and order in a closed system and how gravitational forces can affect this. The idea of a law being invalid is brought up, and the person asking the question inquires about receiving a Nobel prize for their theories. The conversation also mentions the importance of understanding a law before claiming it to be invalid.
  • #1
SELFMADE
80
0
Says, in a closed system disorder is always increasing, more or less.

But with gravitational forces, matters are sticking together--creating order.

Thus the law=invalid

Can I get my Noble?
 
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  • #2
Why do you not apply your theory to say, a collapsing cloud of hydrogen ? Maybe you will find free energy coming out !
 
  • #3
Since you only asked one question, maybe.

I'm not sure what a Noble is so you may get one, but you certainly won't receive a Nobel of any sort for the statements you made.
 
  • #4
SELFMADE said:
Thus the law=invalid
You should be careful about claiming a law is invalid when you haven't understood the law yet.
The effect that you mention transforms potential energy into very disorder kinetic energy.
 
  • #5
SELFMADE said:
Says, in a closed system disorder is always increasing, more or less.

But with gravitational forces, matters are sticking together--creating order.

Thus the law=invalid

Can I get my Noble?

This is rather silly.

The fact that you have an external source of energy via the gravitational potential implies automatically that this is NOT a closed system. If you write the partition function without including such possible energy state, then your function is an incomplete description of the system.

Zz.
 
  • #6
SELFMADE said:
Says, in a closed system disorder is always increasing, more or less.

But with gravitational forces, matters are sticking together--creating order.

Thus the law=invalid

Can I get my Noble?
Someone already locked this, but I had to bring it to everyone's attention: Nothing more classic than a crackpot asking for a "Noble" prize!
 

1. What is the Second Law of Thermodynamics?

The Second Law of Thermodynamics states that the total entropy of a closed system will never decrease over time. In simpler terms, this means that in any natural process, the disorder or randomness of the system will always increase.

2. How does the Second Law of Thermodynamics relate to energy?

The Second Law of Thermodynamics also implies that energy will always flow from higher to lower concentrations, and that some energy will always be lost as heat. This is why most energy transformations are not 100% efficient.

3. Can the Second Law of Thermodynamics be violated?

No, the Second Law of Thermodynamics is considered a fundamental law of nature and has been extensively tested and proven to hold true in all physical and chemical processes. It cannot be violated or broken.

4. How does the Second Law of Thermodynamics impact the environment?

The Second Law of Thermodynamics has a significant impact on the environment. As energy is transferred and transformed, some of it will inevitably be lost as heat, which contributes to the overall increase in entropy and disorder in the universe. This has implications for the sustainability of our resources and the health of our planet.

5. What are some real-life examples of the Second Law of Thermodynamics?

Some examples of the Second Law of Thermodynamics in action include the cooling of a hot cup of coffee, the natural decay of organic matter, and the diffusion of perfume in a room. All of these processes involve the increase of entropy and the flow of energy from a more concentrated to a less concentrated form.

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