Does ice melt faster in water because helps to change the phase

In summary, according to the conversation and information provided, nucleation starts faster when there are more nucleation points present, as seen in the case of ice melting in water. This is because water has a higher heat transfer coefficient than oil, which allows for faster melting. Additionally, the concept of heat transfer is typically covered in a junior level mechanical engineering course, and can be further researched for better understanding. The question of whether ice can be superheated was also discussed, with the conclusion that superheating refers to a substance remaining solid at a temperature higher than its melting point.
  • #1
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so according to this
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nucleation
nucleation start faster when there is a round matter that already in the phase that the other matter is going to ,so in case of ice melting in water because it would have more Nucleation points,
edit: i mafe alittle experience and it does melt faster, in water but in the intrent the answer is that watter clear the heat faster so . I made the same exprince with oil and it worked too but the time diffrance is very low
 
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  • #2
The speed of ice melting is proportional to the heat transfer coefficient (search the term) and the temperature difference. Water has a higher heat transfer coefficient than oil, so ice in water will melt faster than ice in oil. Assuming, of course, that the water and oil are at the same temperature.

If you want to understand why the heat transfer coefficient differs between water and oil, spend some time with the above search. If what you find is difficult to understand, be advised that heat transfer is a junior level course in a college mechanical engineering curriculum. It comes after calculus, physics, and thermodynamics in a typical curriculum: https://www.mtu.edu/mechanical/undergraduate/advising/pdfs/bsme-2019-2020.pdf. So don't get discouraged.
 
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  • #3
jrmichler said:
The speed of ice melting is proportional to the heat transfer coefficient (search the term) and the temperature difference. Water has a higher heat transfer coefficient than oil, so ice in water will melt faster than ice in oil. Assuming, of course, that the water and oil are at the same temperature.

If you want to understand why the heat transfer coefficient differs between water and oil, spend some time with the above search. If what you find is difficult to understand, be advised that heat transfer is a junior level course in a college mechanical engineering curriculum. It comes after calculus, physics, and thermodynamics in a typical curriculum: https://www.mtu.edu/mechanical/undergraduate/advising/pdfs/bsme-2019-2020.pdf. So don't get discouraged.
I also looks for this question over the internet
 
  • #4
danielhaish said:
so in case of ice melting in water because it would have more Nucleation points

Can water ice be superheated?
 
  • #5
danielhaish said:
i think the question is weather ice can stay solid in temperature that higher then 0

Isn't that what superheating means?
 
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  • #6
DrStupid said:
Isn't that what superheating means?
yes you are right , I didn't get it
 
  • #7
DrStupid said:
Isn't that what superheating means?
yes it might but this is not the case I already got my answer because the temperature is getting high faster in water
 

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