Does Research Exist on Biological Neural Network Chips?

In summary, this piloting was meant to keep the F-22 in the air, but it seems to have been a failure.
  • #1
EskWIRED
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I have seen articles dealing with the growth of brain cells using stem cells. I have also seen, in the past, research attempting to mimic neural connections (using traditional silicon chips) for use in computing.

I have searched for any mention of research into using actual living brain cells to form such a neural network, and I have found nothing.

I am wondering about using, as the basis for a neural network chip, living, growing brain cells which could form new neural networks, as needed, much in the same way such networks are formed in growing, learning animals.. I am thinking that maybe a new type of chip could be made for novel applications.

Is anybody doing research into the use of animal stem cells for construction of neural networks?
 
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  • #2
There was a rat neuron colony to pilot F-22 simulator in 2004 ( http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041022104658.htm ), but I haven't seen anything more recent there ... and I generally don't think it is so simple.
The brain has extreme plasticity, but it has obtained the flexibility due to millions of years of evolution - leading to precise structures (like connections with hippocampus) and stochastic rules (e.g. retina itself has about 50 different types of neurons) ... you cannot just plant a random neuron colony and expect that it will self-assemble into something useful.
Much more reasonable (but less ethical) would be taking a developing brain and hardwire it to a new set of inputs/outputs, like to a flight simulator - so it would be the only "life" it knows ... with the proper training/motivation I think a rat brain could be a great pilot ... with similar ethics as drones.
 
  • #3
jarekd said:
Much more reasonable (but less ethical) would be taking a developing brain and hardwire it to a new set of inputs/outputs, like to a flight simulator - so it would be the only "life" it knows ... with the proper training/motivation I think a rat brain could be a great pilot ... with similar ethics as drones.

Thanks for the link. It was very interesting. I looked and found the http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/behindtheheadlines/news/2013-08-29-scientists-grow-mini-human-brain-in-the-lab/, and indeed, they were growing "mini-brains".
 
  • #4
Thanks - interesting and scaring. And it is a bit different - just recreating brain development out of the body.
I have found a paper about this piloting F-22: it was "to maintain straight and level flight" by "rat embryonic (day 18) cortical hemispheres": http://neural.bme.ufl.edu/page13/assets/NeuroFlght2.pdf
 
  • #5


There is indeed research being conducted on biological neural network chips using animal stem cells. In fact, there have been several studies published in recent years exploring the potential of using living brain cells to create neural networks for computing purposes. Some researchers have even successfully grown neural networks on traditional silicon chips using stem cells from animals.

One example of this research is a study published in the journal Nature Communications in 2019, which demonstrated the creation of a hybrid neural network chip using rat neurons. The researchers were able to successfully grow and connect the neurons on the chip, creating a functional network that could perform basic computing tasks.

Another study, published in the journal Advanced Science in 2020, focused on using human stem cells to create a more complex and efficient neural network chip. The researchers were able to grow multiple layers of neurons on the chip, mimicking the structure of a human brain and potentially allowing for more advanced computing capabilities.

While this research is still in its early stages, it shows great potential for the development of novel applications and technologies using biological neural networks. It is an exciting area of research that has the potential to revolutionize the field of computing.
 

Related to Does Research Exist on Biological Neural Network Chips?

1. What are biological neural network chips?

Biological neural network chips are computer chips that are designed to mimic the structure and function of the human brain. They are made up of artificial neurons and synapses that can process and transmit information in a similar way to biological neural networks.

2. How are biological neural network chips different from traditional computer chips?

Traditional computer chips are based on the von Neumann architecture, which uses a central processing unit (CPU) to perform calculations and a separate memory unit to store data. Biological neural network chips, on the other hand, are based on the parallel processing architecture of the brain, where information is processed and stored at the same time in a distributed manner.

3. What is the potential application of biological neural network chips?

Biological neural network chips have the potential to be used in various fields, such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and healthcare. They can be used to develop more efficient and intelligent systems that can learn and adapt to new situations, similar to the way our brains do.

4. Is there any research being done on biological neural network chips?

Yes, there is ongoing research being done on biological neural network chips. Scientists and engineers are constantly working on improving the design and functionality of these chips, as well as exploring new applications for them.

5. What are the current limitations of biological neural network chips?

Some of the current limitations of biological neural network chips include their high cost and complexity, as well as the need for specialized hardware and software to program and operate them. Additionally, these chips are still not as efficient or powerful as the human brain, and more research is needed to improve their performance.

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