Does someone understand this picture? (Solar heating)

In summary: I'm not sure what the blue arrow on the right represents.There is something incomplete in the picture, though.
  • #1
Kolika28
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28
Homework Statement
I'm working with solar heating systems, and my teacher added this picture to his PowerPoint. But I don't understand the picture. Could someone help me?
Relevant Equations
The only thing I understand is that ##I_0## is the energy from the sun. But the other arrows confuse me, and there is now explanation for what the stand for in the presentation
Homework Statement:: I'm working with solar heating systems, and my teacher added this picture to his PowerPoint. But I don't understand the picture. Could someone help me?
Homework Equations:: The only thing I understand is that ##I_0## is the energy from the sun. But the other arrows confuse me, and there is now explanation for what they stand for in the presentation

1575320926791.png
 
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  • #2
It looks like Io is the overall insolation, right? The blue first layer is the glass cover, and the black layer is the thermal absorber? Then Ib would be the reflected intensity (thermal/light energy), and the other arrows represent what escapes and what gets re-refleted back toward the absorber?

I can probably find a better explanation via Google Images...
 
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  • #4
Thank you so much! So I0 is the solar radiation, the yellow arrow is reflection? But Ig still confuse me a bit, mostly because it points both up and down. And what does this equation mean

1575322077229.png
 
  • #5
Kolika28 said:
Ig still confuse me a bit, mostly because it points both up and down.
Ig is the thermal radiation from the hot glass. Necessarily it radiates equally up and down.
The total power reaching the base is I0+Ig, and the thermal radiation from the base is related to its temperature by Stefan's law. In equilibrium, these two must be equal.
I do not understand the I0=Ig equation. I would guess that applies in some special circumstance, but I cannot think what.
 
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  • #6
haruspex said:
Ig is the thermal radiation from the hot glass. Necessarily it radiates equally up and down.
The total power reaching the base is I0+Ig, and the thermal radiation from the base is related to its temperature by Stefan's law. In equilibrium, these two must be equal.
I do not understand the I0=Ig equation. I would guess that applies in some special circumstance, but I cannot think what.
Thank you so much for this great explanation! Really appreciate it!
 
  • #7
Kolika28 said:
Thank you so much for this great explanation! Really appreciate it!
There is something incomplete in the picture, though. The radiation that comes through the atmosphere from the sun includes an IR component, some of which is absorbed and reradiated by the glass.
 
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1. What is solar heating?

Solar heating refers to the process of using energy from the sun to heat a space or water for domestic or commercial use.

2. How does solar heating work?

Solar heating systems use solar panels to collect and absorb energy from the sun. This energy is then converted into heat which can be used to warm up spaces or water.

3. What are the benefits of solar heating?

Solar heating is a renewable and sustainable energy source, which means it is better for the environment compared to traditional heating methods. It also helps to reduce energy costs in the long run.

4. Are there different types of solar heating?

Yes, there are two main types of solar heating: active and passive. Active solar heating systems use mechanical and electrical components to collect and distribute heat, while passive solar heating systems rely on natural heat transfer processes.

5. Is solar heating suitable for all climates?

Solar heating systems can be used in all climates, but their effectiveness may vary depending on the amount of sunlight and temperature fluctuations in the area. In colder climates, additional backup heating may be needed to supplement solar heating systems.

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